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Iranian Authorities Torture Gay Youth

Posted by Bruce Carroll at 10:06 pm - September 20, 2005.
Filed under: Gays in Other Lands,War On Terror

Thank goodness that at least one gay organization in the world, OutRage!, actually cares about the real and physical (not imagined) war against our community by the Islamic Fascist governments and terror organizations.

Iran sanctions state violence against gay people
Gay Amir, aged 22, given 100 lashes
Apathy of gay, left and human rights groups condemned

London – 20 September 2005

The bruised and bloodied body of a 22 year old gay Iranian, Amir, bears witness to the brutality of the Ayatollah’s regime.

Amir escaped Iran after the authorities threatened him with execution for being gay – but not before he was subjected to the barbarism of 100 lashes, which left his back covered in huge bloody welts.

A copy of Amir’s story, together with photos of his savage injuries, has been sent to the British LGBT human rights group OutRage! by Iranian LGBT activists (see below).

View the photos of Amir:
http://www.outrage.org.uk/imagezoom.asp?file=Iranian_gay_flogging1
http://www.outrage.org.uk/imagezoom.asp?file=Iranian_gay_flogging2
http://www.outrage.org.uk/imagezoom.asp?file=Iranian_gay_flogging3
http://www.outrage.org.uk/imagezoom.asp?file=Iranian_gay_flogging4
http://www.outrage.org.uk/imagezoom.asp?file=Iranian_gay_flogging5
http://www.outrage.org.uk/imagezoom.asp?file=Iranian_gay_flogging6

“This is a further example of the violent homophobia of the Iran’s Islamic fundamentalist regime,” said Brett Lock of OutRage!

OutRage! is appalled that large sections of liberal and left opinion in the West shows little concern regarding the murderous brutality of the clerical fascist regime in Tehran.

“We deplore the gullibility of many gay, left and human rights groups concerning the abuse of LGBT human rights in Iran.

“Too many are willing to believe the smears and slurs of the Iranian government and state-approved newspapers like Qods.

“When two young men were executed for same-sex acts in the Iranian city of Mashad in July, some left and human rights organisations accepted at face value claims by the state-controlled media that the youths were hanged for rape.

“Similar gullibility has been shown by some left-wingers. They have long swallowed Iran’s homophobic propaganda.

“Believing the stories in Iran’s state-sanctioned media is like accepting the news as reported by the press in Franco’s Spain or Pinochet’s Chile.

“Where are the left-wing campaigns in western countries to support the freedom struggles of Iranian LGBTs, women, democrats, socialists and workers?

Answer: They are accusing the popularly-elected, and re-elected leaders of their own democracies of being the “real terrorists” and so wound up in their own self-absorbed panties about the semantics of civil unions versus marriage to care.

Welcome to readers from Best of the Web and Roger L. Simon!

-Bruce (GayPatriot)

UPDATE (from GPW): Commenting on Bruce’s post, the Anchoress explains, “The condition is this: In order to be offended by images of torture, the torturers have to be U.S. Troops, serving under a CIC who has an R after his name.” Read the whole thing.

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79 Comments

  1. Think of how many gay Iraqis you saw blogging under Saddam Hussein’s regime, bitching and complaining about their government, before the war.

    I saw one before the war: Salam Pax.

    I’ve seen one after the war: Salam Pax.

    The one I saw before the war is now writing that after the war things are worse do to the implementation of sharia. Granted the Iraqi sample size is only one, but n all other countries where sharia has been followed…like say Iran, mentioned at the top of this post… life for Gays is pretty horrible, which meshes with what Salam wrote recently.

    Unless you can provide some information to the contrary, say the adoption of a domestic partner article in the Iraqi constitution or video footage of gay rights parades in Tikrit, it’s a pretty fair wager that life for gays has gotten worse.

    So, I’ll ask again, for the third time, SD30 or anyone else who wants to jump in, how are gay Iraqis current, worsening situation, an improvement over what went on before?

    Comment by Jody — September 21, 2005 @ 7:27 pm - September 21, 2005

  2. Actually, go look before the war, and see what you see.

    Then again, you may not want to….it will shake your faith in the paradise that was pre-war Iraq as explained by Michael Moore — you know, total freedom, ample electricity, no corruption, nothing of the sort.

    Comment by North Dallas Thirty — September 21, 2005 @ 9:48 pm - September 21, 2005

  3. ND30, nice dodge but still no dice.

    It’s understood that the situation under Saddam, for people in general and gays specifically, was pretty bad. However, by Pax own accounting, under a government that we are condoning, a constitution we’re advising on, and a sharia colored legal system we’re supporting, its gotten worse for gay people.

    Very simple.

    I’ll ask again, and I’ll ask you not to dodge by launching into Michael Moore Bashing Vacuous Comeback #372964, how are gay Iraqis’ current worsening situation, an improvement over what went on before?

    Comment by Jody — September 21, 2005 @ 10:18 pm - September 21, 2005

  4. It’s not clear at all yet what the situation is for gays in the new Iraq since the new Constitution hasn’t even been ratified and it contains passages that could cut two different ways depending on how they’re interpreted.

    In some ways clearly the new Constitution gives more rights than anyone, gay or straight, male or female, ever had under Saddam, not least of which are the right to free speech, free press, the right to vote in genuine competitive elections, the right to hold office, the right to trial by jury, the right not to be tortured, and all the rights guaranteed under the UN charter on human rights.

    It is possible that the provision of the new Iraqi constitution that laws can’t be contrary to the principles of Islam will be interpreted to criminalize gay people. But we don’t yet know for sure what the long term will hold. We do know that the new Constitution would make whipping someone like they did to this poor kid illegal.

    But then, the kid did get off easy–under Iranian law, he could have been executed–Just as they’ve done to thousands like him.

    Comment by Dean Esmay — September 22, 2005 @ 12:47 am - September 22, 2005

  5. It’s not clear at all yet what the situation is for gays in the new Iraq since the new Constitution hasn’t even been ratified and it contains passages that could cut two different ways depending on how they’re interpreted.

    I have to disagree, Dean. We know what the situation was for people in general, and gays in particular, before we ousted Saddam. Now, in this interim time, where sharia has been adopted in a great many regions throughout the country and by the recent comments from a gay person living under that situation, we can see that things have gotten worse.

    The proposed Constitution doesn’t really have anything in it that would suggest gays are going to be treated any differently — sharia again being mentioned as a chief principle of their legal structure.

    So if the constitution passes, odds are not very good for any improvement, and fairly good for the situation to continue to worsen. If the constitution fails to be accepted, again, its pretty fair to conclude that gays aren’t going well. Unless you’ve got some evidence to the contrary, I think its rather wishful thinking to conclude the gay Iraqi situation is going to do a 180.

    The difference between the way things were under Saddam, the way things are under the Iranian mullahs (vis a vis gays, the topic of Bruce’s post), and the way things are under us, is that now it’s directly our responsibility for how things turn out.

    It’s that whole “Pottery Barn” rule.

    Comment by Jody — September 22, 2005 @ 3:53 am - September 22, 2005

  6. #41 – “…what I asked was how are gay Iraqis current, worsening situation, and improvement over what went on before?”

    It is the difference between theory and reality, Jody.

    You’ve posited that things under Iraq’s new constitution will be bad for gays. Quite possibly. The world shall see. I mean that literally, because if things do become bad for gays in Iraq, at least some of them will be able to tell us (which none could under Saddam).

    But Saddam’s torture, imprisonment and execution of tens of thousands of his own citizens every year – including thousands of gays per year – was horribly real. Not “possible”.

    Can you link a case in Iraq currently of gays being tortured or executed, like the cases we’ve seen recently in Iran?

    I will confess frankly that I hope you can’t – just because such events would be reprehensible and tragic, like the Iranian cases.

    Comment by joe — September 22, 2005 @ 6:32 am - September 22, 2005

  7. #50 – And the U.N. made that call. If it’s not too advanced for you Chandler, look up U.N. Resolution 1441 sometime.

    Comment by joe — September 22, 2005 @ 6:34 am - September 22, 2005

  8. #51 – “Unless you can provide some information to the contrary, say the adoption of a domestic partner article in the Iraqi constitution or video footage of gay rights parades in Tikrit, it’s a pretty fair wager that life for gays has gotten worse.”

    That’s a pretty “armchair liberal” statement.

    No country in the Middle East is a place where they are about to adopt gay marriage, domestic partner articles or transsexual pride parades. And those aren’t even the first things life is about. The first thing life is about, is not being killed, imprisoned or tortured by one’s government. That’s the measure and standard (low as it may be) of gay rights in the Middle East. Let’s talk about how gays were killed, imprisoned and tortured under Saddam, and whether things in Iraq today have gotten better or worse on that score.

    Comment by joe — September 22, 2005 @ 6:38 am - September 22, 2005

  9. #55 – “Now, in this interim time, where sharia has been adopted in a great many regions throughout the country and by the recent comments from a gay person living under that situation, we can see that things have gotten worse.”

    That’s what you need to substantiate for the unenlightened, Jody.

    How have they gotten worse? What could be worse for gays in Iraq today than having no free speech, secret police watching every move and then being killed, imprisoned or tortured? If things in real life in Iraq today are worse than that, by all means, please enlighten us with specific cases you’ve seen in news articles or your blog reading.

    Comment by joe — September 22, 2005 @ 6:44 am - September 22, 2005

  10. And if you have a blog, post an article (and link from here) about the real plight of Iraqi gays, by all means.

    Comment by joe — September 22, 2005 @ 6:45 am - September 22, 2005

  11. This link given earlier was definitely worth reading: http://www.wpherald.com/storyview.php?StoryID=20050917-102824-9029r

    A couple of quick points about it:

    – Salam Pax says “Now they worry about being stoned to death”. But is that because they’ve actually been stoned to death? He doesn’t say. If anyone can get pictures, like the Iranian cases, they should be publicized. Have they?

    – Salam Pax says “During Saddam Hussein’s reign, gays were basically ignored unless it became too flagrant…” That makes no sense. Saddam imprisoned, killed and tortured his own citizens at a rate of tens of thousands per year. On a statistical basis alone, that would necessarily include thousands of gays, whether or not they were being “flagrant” or even the tiniest bit sexually active.

    Comment by joe — September 22, 2005 @ 6:56 am - September 22, 2005

  12. Another example. See:

    http://blogmeisterusa.blogspot.com/2005/09/muslims-attack-christians-no-news-at.html

    Comment by rightwingprof — September 22, 2005 @ 9:41 am - September 22, 2005

  13. I would say that the question has been answered quite nicely. 🙂

    Comment by North Dallas Thirty — September 22, 2005 @ 11:53 am - September 22, 2005

  14. #50
    My pleasure joey:

    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and United States of America: draft resolution

    [Adopted as Resolution 1441 at Security Council meeting 4644, 8 November 2002]

    The Security Council,

    Recalling all its previous relevant resolutions, in particular its resolutions 661 (1990) of 6 August 1990, 678 (1990) of 29 November 1990, 686 (1991) of 2 March 1991, 687 (1991) of 3 April 1991, 688 (1991) of 5 April 1991, 707 (1991) of 15 August 1991, 715 (1991) of 11 October 1991, 986 (1995) of 14 April 1995, and 1284 (1999) of 17 December 1999, and all the relevant statements of its President,

    Recalling also its resolution 1382 (2001) of 29 November 2001 and its intention to implement it fully,

    Recognizing the threat Iraq’s non-compliance with Council resolutions and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and long-range missiles poses to international peace and security,

    Recalling that its resolution 678 (1990) authorized Member States to use all necessary means to uphold and implement its resolution 660 (1990) of 2 August 1990 and all relevant resolutions subsequent to resolution 660 (1990) and to restore international peace and security in the area,

    Further recalling that its resolution 687 (1991) imposed obligations on Iraq as a necessary step for achievement of its stated objective of restoring international peace and security in the area,

    Deploring the fact that Iraq has not provided an accurate, full, final, and complete disclosure, as required by resolution 687 (1991), of all aspects of its programmes to develop weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missiles with a range greater than one hundred and fifty kilometres, and of all holdings of such weapons, their components and production facilities and locations, as well as all other nuclear programmes, including any which it claims are for purposes not related to nuclear-weapons-usable material,

    Deploring further that Iraq repeatedly obstructed immediate, unconditional, and unrestricted access to sites designated by the United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), failed to cooperate fully and unconditionally with UNSCOM and IAEA weapons inspectors, as required by resolution 687 (1991), and ultimately ceased all cooperation with UNSCOM and the IAEA in 1998,

    Deploring the absence, since December 1998, in Iraq of international monitoring, inspection, and verification, as required by relevant resolutions, of weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missiles, in spite of the Council’s repeated demands that Iraq provide immediate, unconditional, and unrestricted access to the United Nations Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC), established in resolution 1284 (1999) as the successor organization to UNSCOM, and the IAEA, and regretting the consequent prolonging of the crisis in the region and the suffering of the Iraqi people,

    Deploring also that the Government of Iraq has failed to comply with its commitments pursuant to resolution 687 (1991) with regard to terrorism, pursuant to resolution 688 (1991) to end repression of its civilian population and to provide access by international humanitarian organizations to all those in need of assistance in Iraq, and pursuant to resolutions 686 (1991), 687 (1991), and 1284 (1999) to return or cooperate in accounting for Kuwaiti and third country nationals wrongfully detained by Iraq, or to return Kuwaiti property wrongfully seized by Iraq,

    Recalling that in its resolution 687 (1991) the Council declared that a ceasefire would be based on acceptance by Iraq of the provisions of that resolution, including the obligations on Iraq contained therein,

    Determined to ensure full and immediate compliance by Iraq without conditions or restrictions with its obligations under resolution 687 (1991) and other relevant resolutions and recalling that the resolutions of the Council constitute the governing standard of Iraqi compliance,

    Recalling that the effective operation of UNMOVIC, as the successor organization to the Special Commission, and the IAEA is essential for the implementation of resolution 687 (1991) and other relevant resolutions,

    Noting the letter dated 16 September 2002 from the Minister for Foreign Affairs of Iraq addressed to the Secretary-General is a necessary first step toward rectifying Iraq’s continued failure to comply with relevant Council resolutions,

    Noting further the letter dated 8 October 2002 from the Executive Chairman of UNMOVIC and the Director-General of the IAEA to General Al-Saadi of the Government of Iraq laying out the practical arrangements, as a follow-up to their meeting in Vienna, that are prerequisites for the resumption of inspections in Iraq by UNMOVIC and the IAEA, and expressing the gravest concern at the continued failure by the Government of Iraq to provide confirmation of the arrangements as laid out in that letter,

    Reaffirming the commitment of all Member States to the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iraq, Kuwait, and the neighbouring States,

    Commending the Secretary-General and members of the League of Arab States and its Secretary-General for their efforts in this regard,

    Determined to secure full compliance with its decisions,

    Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

    1. Decides that Iraq has been and remains in material breach of its obligations under relevant resolutions, including resolution 687 (1991), in particular through Iraq’s failure to cooperate with United Nations inspectors and the IAEA, and to complete the actions required under paragraphs 8 to 13 of resolution 687 (1991);

    2. Decides, while acknowledging paragraph 1 above, to afford Iraq, by this resolution, a final opportunity to comply with its disarmament obligations under relevant resolutions of the Council; and accordingly decides to set up an enhanced inspection regime with the aim of bringing to full and verified completion the disarmament process established by resolution 687 (1991) and subsequent resolutions of the Council;

    3. Decides that, in order to begin to comply with its disarmament obligations, in addition to submitting the required biannual declarations, the Government of Iraq shall provide to UNMOVIC, the IAEA, and the Council, not later than 30 days from the date of this resolution, a currently accurate, full, and complete declaration of all aspects of its programmes to develop chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons, ballistic missiles, and other delivery systems such as unmanned aerial vehicles and dispersal systems designed for use on aircraft, including any holdings and precise locations of such weapons, components, sub-components, stocks of agents, and related material and equipment, the locations and work of its research, development and production facilities, as well as all other chemical, biological, and nuclear programmes, including any which it claims are for purposes not related to weapon production or material;

    4. Decides that false statements or omissions in the declarations submitted by Iraq pursuant to this resolution and failure by Iraq at any time to comply with, and cooperate fully in the implementation of, this resolution shall constitute a further material breach of Iraq’s obligations and will be reported to the Council for assessment in accordance with paragraphs 11 and 12 below;

    5. Decides that Iraq shall provide UNMOVIC and the IAEA immediate, unimpeded, unconditional, and unrestricted access to any and all, including underground, areas, facilities, buildings, equipment, records, and means of transport which they wish to inspect, as well as immediate, unimpeded, unrestricted, and private access to all officials and other persons whom UNMOVIC or the IAEA wish to interview in the mode or location of UNMOVIC’s or the IAEA’s choice pursuant to any aspect of their mandates; further decides that UNMOVIC and the IAEA may at their discretion conduct interviews inside or outside of Iraq, may facilitate the travel of those interviewed and family members outside of Iraq, and that, at the sole discretion of UNMOVIC and the IAEA, such interviews may occur without the presence of observers from the Iraqi Government; and instructs UNMOVIC and requests the IAEA to resume inspections no later than 45 days following adoption of this resolution and to update the Council 60 days thereafter;

    6. Endorses the 8 October 2002 letter from the Executive Chairman of UNMOVIC and the Director-General of the IAEA to General Al-Saadi of the Government of Iraq, which is annexed hereto, and decides that the contents of the letter shall be binding upon Iraq;

    7. Decides further that, in view of the prolonged interruption by Iraq of the presence of UNMOVIC and the IAEA and in order for them to accomplish the tasks set forth in this resolution and all previous relevant resolutions and notwithstanding prior understandings, the Council hereby establishes the following revised or additional authorities, which shall be binding upon Iraq, to facilitate their work in Iraq:

    – UNMOVIC and the IAEA shall determine the composition of their inspection teams and ensure that these teams are composed of the most qualified and experienced experts available;

    Comment by chandler in hollywood — September 22, 2005 @ 5:15 pm - September 22, 2005

  15. #64 shoulkd have referenced joeys #57.
    joey,
    Now tell me what part contradicts anything I have said?

    It even includes the faulty statement of WMD’s as fact.

    So you were saying…

    Comment by chandler in hollywood — September 22, 2005 @ 5:20 pm - September 22, 2005

  16. #65

    Cute. Now let’s see if you can read and comprehend that and the Iraq Liberation Act instead of just copying and pasting.

    Comment by ThatGayConservative — September 22, 2005 @ 6:20 pm - September 22, 2005

  17. Parting Shots

    My schedule has not allowed me the time for as much sight-seeing (or blogging) as I would like this week. (Now I know why the idea of a guest blogger is so attractive, at least someone to keep the lights on, but it all seems just too vain and insipid o…

    Trackback by The Malcontent — September 23, 2005 @ 11:06 am - September 23, 2005

  18. #66
    Now what?

    Comment by chandler in hollywood — September 23, 2005 @ 1:51 pm - September 23, 2005

  19. Chandler, I think No. 66 has been assigned to follow you.

    Comment by Queer Patriot — September 23, 2005 @ 10:11 pm - September 23, 2005

  20. You can start with this one, Chandler:

    Recognizing the threat Iraq’s non-compliance with Council resolutions and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and long-range missiles poses to international peace and security,

    Comment by North Dallas Thirty — September 24, 2005 @ 2:07 am - September 24, 2005

  21. #70
    You want me to start with a conclusion based on a faulty assumptiom. What am I, a Republican?

    Comment by chandler in hollywood — September 24, 2005 @ 2:23 pm - September 24, 2005

  22. You know Chandler, I was wondering why ThatGayConservative wasn’t sure you had actually read Resolution 1441….but now I see why.

    You don’t believe that Iraq was not in compliance with UN Security Council resolutions.

    You don’t believe that Iraq, aside from having the al-Samoud missiles that were already illegal, was working on others and was working with North Korea.

    Finally, you don’t believe that not only did Saddam have the means, he also had the method and the will to build, distribute, and use WMDs.

    There’s the problem.

    Comment by North Dallas Thirty — September 24, 2005 @ 8:08 pm - September 24, 2005

  23. Gays and Iran

    Kudos to Doug Ireland for doggedly following the persecution of gays in Iran. But is he really deserving of such special credit, as Andrew Sullivan suggests? (Gay Patriot’s attention to this issue, for instance, is also worthy of mention.) Has libera…

    Trackback by The Malcontent — September 30, 2005 @ 11:59 am - September 30, 2005

  24. salam man kave hastam 22 salame mikham ba ye aghaye mosen ashena besham vase gay
    my email:kave_o2000@yahoo.com

    Comment by kave — January 8, 2006 @ 9:59 am - January 8, 2006

  25. quiero hacer el amor con muchos chicos y soy de colombia

    Comment by raul — April 2, 2006 @ 5:38 pm - April 2, 2006

  26. Very nice site. I actually found it doing some research on my golf projeect I am getting ready to launch. Do you have a rss feed I can grab? Good job! 🙂

    Comment by used golf equipment — April 8, 2006 @ 7:01 am - April 8, 2006

  27. Most gays that I know are steadfastly opposed to the US regardless of what it does *. The ill intent of the regimes they back seem to not register as a danger
    One gay celebrity (don’t remember which) said that “America’s policies on gays should be more in line with the world”
    If you really want that, I am fine with it. Maybe they REALLY are into S&M…

    * If the US backed mandatory clean air and water laws for ALL nations, they would whine and bitch that the US was violating the other countries’ sovereignty

    Comment by GW Crawford — April 14, 2006 @ 6:12 pm - April 14, 2006

  28. Atomic bomb is very good for this criminal governement Iran !

    Comment by JNRC — September 7, 2006 @ 7:56 am - September 7, 2006

  29. My heart and spirit is still with killed iranian boys…Iran is Satan and pure evil country!I hope,the present Iran political system and goverment will be destroyed!GOD HELP AS!

    Comment by estoskin(gayskinhead) — January 19, 2007 @ 7:59 pm - January 19, 2007

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