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What Jay Bennish and Anti-Gay Whackoes Have in Common

Posted by GayPatriotWest at 10:57 pm - March 9, 2006.
Filed under: Bush-hatred

Last week before my computer woes, I had sketched out some notes for a post on Jay Bennish, that left-wing geography teacher who went wild in the Rocky Mountain State. I was going to note that he attacks the President like many social conservatives attack gays, not based on the president’s actual record (or rhetoric given this teacher’s comments) but on what he believes his rhetoric to be. Just as social conservatives who bash gays rarely quote the actual statements of the gays they love to loath. And have defined our lives by their own twisted image of what they call our “lifestyle.”

In his comments comparing the president to Hitler, Bennish never actually quotes the man he compares to the bloodthirsty and charismatic psychopath. To be sure from time to time, anti-gay social conservatives (unlike Bennish) do manage to quote from statements of certain “homosexuals,” but they almost always refer to the most extreme “sexual liberationists” or whatnot, sort of like someone quoting from Madonna’s book on sex to define heterosexual love in America.

As time passed and I thought of Bennish’s remarks, it occurred to me how obsessed this man is with the president. He may claim that he had hoped to make such a bold statement in order to promote discussion, but I wonder why a geography teacher would bring up a subject more suited for a Political Science or Current Events class. I’m not sure how comparing Bush to Hitler can help students distinguish between an estuary and a tributary — or even between the topography of those two very different men’s homelands.

Mr. Bennish is not the only Bush-hater to bring up the president in a discussion of something unrelated to politics or world affairs.

A few months ago, I was chatting with an acquaintance at the gym. He mentioned that he was looking for a new car; I asked him what kind. He was leaning toward an SUV. Before I could comment on his preference, he (not knowing my politics) said, “But I’m not a Bush supporter.” I wondered why buying an SUV would indicate support for the president (especially given that if an SUV in this area is sporting a bumper sticker from the ’04 campaign, it’s all but certain to be a Kerry-Edwards one).

I’m sure y’all can come up with other examples of Bush-haters bringing up the president’s nasty nature and malign motives when it seems (to the level-headed individual) irrelevant to the conversation at hand.

What is it, I wonder that makes this people so obsessed with Bush that they will bring him up in a geography class — or in the discussion of buying a new car?

These people are, in many ways, just like gay-baiting social conservatives. They’re as obsessed with us as Jay Bennish and Michael Moore are with President Bush. They’ll bring up “homosexuals” at the drop of the hat. I recall how at one GOP gathering in Northern Virginia in 1998, upon learning of my support for Henriette Warfield, then the chair of the Arlington County GOP, a woman faulted Henriette for promoting the “homosexual agenda.” This woman didn’t know I was gay (I came out only after she attacked Henriette) and was only aware that that great chairwoman had welcomed the Log Cabin Republican Club of Northern Virginia into the local party. (She could point to any policy stand Ms. Warfield had taken on gay issues.) What struck me about this woman was that of all the issues to fault Henriette, she chose the “homosexual” one.

You’ve got to wonder about those people who dwell constantly on their hatred for an individual or group, especially when that individual (or group) is not relevant to the conversation at hand — or the class they’re teaching.

-Dan (AKA GayPatriotWest): GayPatriotWest@aol.com

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20 Comments

  1. There are actually answers to the questions you ask.

    Bush’s SOTU was relevant to this particular geography class because it was accelerated World Geography. The syllabus, which was reviewed, approved, and signed by each parent and the school, made clear that politics, economics and current events would be part of the curriculum.

    Further, Bennish said in his Today Show interview that Sean Allen, as well as other students, had prompted the discussion by asking him about the SOTU from the previous night. The students could get extra credit for writing or giving an oral presentation on the topics, regardless of viewpoint, so it wasn’t wasted class time, either.

    Perhaps it was wrong of Bennish to compare the tone of Bush’s SOTU with the tone of Hitler’s speeches — without supporting evidence in the form of quotes, which is understandable given the unplanned nature of the comment — but the topic was certainly not out of place.

    Comment by Julie O. — March 10, 2006 @ 1:29 am - March 10, 2006

  2. Why is it these Bush haters are so obsessed with letting us know how they feel? I recently returned from a wonderful trip to Australia, and the very first question one of my co-workers asked me was “So, did a lot of people ask about our idiot president?” I was so tempted to tell her off, but that’s probably all she was looking for. Instead, I told her the truth… “No, no one mentioned the president, they were more interested in learning about me, if I was having a good time, and what they could do to help me.” I think she was actually disappointed to hear that, and then proceeded to tell me that she really has no desire to visit Australia, but she loves going to France. Why doesn’t that surprise me? It’s like she couldn’t get me upset with her comment about President Bush, so she took one more stab at trying to insult me for going to Australia in the first place. What a miserable life some of these people must have.

    Comment by Barry — March 10, 2006 @ 1:37 am - March 10, 2006

  3. Julie O, #1, I don’t care what kind of class it was, and I don’t care what questions students may have asked, Jay Bennish was out of line.

    A public school teacher has absolutely no business expressing personal political opinions in a classroom. If asked by students how he feels about an issue, the teacher has an obligation to dodge the question and, instead, urge students to share their opinions, making sure students on each side of the issue have equal opporunity to state their views.

    If teachers are allowed to express personal opinions there’s no way administrators or school boards can make sure students also hear the other side.

    I don’t care whether the teacher’s view is as outrageously liberal as Bennish’s was or as outrageously conservative as a recent situation when a teacher posted religious statements on a classroom bulletin board reserved for curriculum materials. THe personal agendas of teachers don’t belong in the public school classrooms.

    Comment by Jack Allen — March 10, 2006 @ 2:54 am - March 10, 2006

  4. Sean Allen is changing schools because of threats of violence. That’s today’s brave, tolerant left, for you. Threatening to beat up a kid for daring to make public his teacher’s inappropriate classroom ranting.

    Comment by V the K — March 10, 2006 @ 5:42 am - March 10, 2006

  5. Julie what facts exactly was Bennish providing in that “lecture?”
    He says he provides multiple points of view-I didn’t hear any other than the leftist talking points.
    What exactly was the lesson plan for that day? The only thing that was factual during that transcript was the dictionary definition of capitalism.
    And while you are at it, just what is the balancing point of view for Bush is like Hitler?

    Sorry, but I can think of about 100 different ways to comment on the SOTU speech that would be balanced and factual, instead this guy went off on a lefty tangent and provided absolutely no facts to back up what he was saying, and for a teacher he even had some of his facts wrong (for instance the bean that makes chocolate is not the same bean that makes cocaine, but apparantly the US thinks chocolate is dangerous).

    Comment by just me — March 10, 2006 @ 6:35 am - March 10, 2006

  6. #0 – “…I was chatting with an acquaintance at the gym. He mentioned that he was looking for a new car; I asked him what kind. He was leaning toward an SUV. Before I could comment on his preference, he (not knowing my politics) said, “But I’m not a Bush supporter.”

    Classic.

    Let me speculate: He read an article in Mother Jones or The Nation equating the enjoyment of a big, well-built car (SUV) with all that is evil about American power. Or maybe it was an AP headline or idiot bumper sticker implying (wrongly) that SUVs are destroying the planet.

    And, like a typical weak and guilty liberal (I’m guessing), he couldn’t see through that “group” viewpoint or think for himself, but neither could he practice what he had accepted from the group and give up his natural enjoyment of a well-made car. Lame!

    In that context (or if I’m right), “But I’m not a Bush supporter” would be a short-hand way of apologizing for his ‘evil’ desire and saying, “I beg your indulgence. I beg you to understand that I pay for this ‘sin’ by supporting ‘good’ liberal causes that you would or should approve of. Don’t hate me!”

    Which touches on an interesting issue. In real life, left-liberal philosophy can’t or shouldn’t be practiced. Socialist values don’t support life, and work against human nature. Anyone who accepts them, lives in sort of a continual vague fog of guilt over being who they are naturally. Kind of like being a medieval Catholic. Yet they claim to have evolved beyond that 🙂

    Comment by Calarato — March 10, 2006 @ 7:41 am - March 10, 2006

  7. Dan, hate as a motive for moving people on public policy issues, candidates, or ballot initiatives is as old as humanity’s effort to effect mass democracy and self-government of society.

    If you’ve ever worked on campaign, for a candidate or on a ballot initiative, you know that irrational motives and uninformed opinions drive a minority to the polls. The old James Buchanan quote: “I will not cast a vote for him because his name sounds Irish” had more to do with prejudice, bigotry and hatred but, most importantly, had to do with Pres Buchanan’s passionate, ego-centric belief that his opinion was a monopoly on truth.

    Passions –like hate– are what allow some liberals and conservatives to imagine they are “safe” or protected in publicly venting their hatred. What we need to do as good citizens is to identify their speech as hate-filled and reinforce the expectation of civilty in society and public discourse.

    Here in Michigan, Freddie Phelp’s hate brigade is coming in on Sunday to protest at a military funeral in Flushing. It is their passionate zealotry and confirmed belief that they hold a monopoly on truth and that motivates them to indecent acts.

    What decent people need to do is protect the civility of the public square, call hate for what it is, and do it in manner which is respectful of our traditions of dissent. The goal isn’t to persuade Fred Phelp’s folks their actions are indecent; the goal is to preserve the public square and protect the rightful expectations of a family and community to grieve its loss without having to tolerate indecent acts.

    Bush hatred is no different. Nor is hatred of the GOP. Nor of gays.

    Uninformed, uneducated and unwilling to learn often describes voters in the polling booth –and sometimes it is Hate which brings them there.

    Comment by Michigan-Matt — March 10, 2006 @ 9:03 am - March 10, 2006

  8. It is their passionate zealotry and confirmed belief that they hold a monopoly on truth and that motivates them to indecent acts.

    I don’t think that’s it. (Respectful disagreement here.) I think some people have a pathological “need” to hate. Hate is a form of addiction. It’s an emotion that produces a mental state that, if people take joy in being in that mental state, they will continuously seek to create and sustain it.

    I thnk the reason so much hate spews from the Left is because the Left creates an environment in which it is okay to hate, even encouraged, so long as hate is directed only at Republicans, conservatives, Christians, and Bush. To people who are addicted to hate, the modern left is a crackhouse. I think the same is true of Phelps organization.

    Comment by V the K — March 10, 2006 @ 9:52 am - March 10, 2006

  9. I wonder if the Phelps group isn’t really hoping for someone to attack them , so they can sue, and then retire to Port St Lucie.

    Comment by hank — March 10, 2006 @ 12:01 pm - March 10, 2006

  10. From the title:

    It’s “Wacko.” From “wacky,” meaning “crazy.”

    “Whacko” might be a derivative of “whack,” but that means “hit.”

    Comment by raj — March 10, 2006 @ 12:31 pm - March 10, 2006

  11. Raj, actually as I retitled the post, I consulted with Malcontent’s Robbie who thought I was using the proper spelling.

    Comment by GayPatriotWest — March 10, 2006 @ 1:08 pm - March 10, 2006

  12. This morning I read of a Business teacher who went off on a long rant on tape about homosexuality in her school this week. I don’t have a problem with her or the Geography teacher ranting their personal beliefs, unless they should have been teaching during that period. Its a debate that we are better off for having. And its a better solution than those who want to elminate “hate-speech”, or force Librarians to take books with gays in them off the shelf of their Library.

    Comment by Patrick (gryph) — March 10, 2006 @ 3:10 pm - March 10, 2006

  13. Further, Bennish said in his Today Show interview that Sean Allen, as well as other students, had prompted the discussion by asking him about the SOTU from the previous night.

    Then, Jay Bennish was lying, because you can hear him on the tape bringing up the SOTU himself before launching into his Marxist diatribe … with NO prompting from the students.

    Gee, a lying leftist. Don’t see that every day. /SARC

    Comment by V the K — March 10, 2006 @ 3:44 pm - March 10, 2006

  14. Also, it strikes me what a wuss this Bennish freak is. He’s perfectly content to lecture and bash Bush and spew Marxism in his classroom, but when he gets called on it, he cowers, weasels, and won’t associate himself with any of it.

    Comment by V the K — March 10, 2006 @ 3:53 pm - March 10, 2006

  15. A public school teacher has absolutely no business expressing personal political opinions in a classroom. If asked by students how he feels about an issue, the teacher has an obligation to dodge the question and, instead, urge students to share their opinions, making sure students on each side of the issue have equal opporunity to state their views.

    That is exactly my policy. My students have no idea what my pollitics are. I will discuss politics with ex-students if they want, and do, since I have many ex-students who are College Republicans or YAF members, but my politics are off-limits in my classroom.

    Conservative faculty are like smokers; because we’re pushed to the edge we tend to know one another and talk. I only know one conservative faculty member who pushes his politics on his classes; yet, I can’t think of one moonbat faculty member who does not bring his politics into the classroom.

    And at what business school did a conservative faculty member bring his politics into the classroom? Or is this just something you imagined?

    Comment by rightwingprof — March 10, 2006 @ 4:56 pm - March 10, 2006

  16. Further, Bennish said in his Today Show interview that Sean Allen, as well as other students, had prompted the discussion by asking him about the SOTU from the previous night.

    Except that’s nowhere on the tape.

    Comment by rightwingprof — March 10, 2006 @ 4:57 pm - March 10, 2006

  17. rightwingprof, #15, I wasn’t sure that YAF was still active; haven’t seen or heard anything about it in ages. I was a YAF state chairman just years after William F. Buckley Jr. encouraged formation of the organization.

    Regarding Fred Phelps and his church’s protests at military funerals: His daughter announced this week that they will NOT be protesting in those states where laws have been passed restricting when or where they may picket. She said they were not interested in being arrested. She added that at some point they will sue to challenge the constitutionality of the laws.

    Comment by Jack Allen — March 10, 2006 @ 6:34 pm - March 10, 2006

  18. I agree that personal opinion on politics doesnt belong in the classroom. For one thing, not knowing where you proffessor stands means you are likely to think more for yourself, than spout back your proffessors talking points.

    But I am also bothered by the fact that this doesn’t appear to teach with much of a lesson plan. If the only fact covered in about 20 minutes time is the definition of capitalism, there is a problem with the teacher.

    The sad thing is this guy will probably be back at work within a couple of weeks, and the student has to change schools because of harrassment.

    Comment by just me — March 10, 2006 @ 7:21 pm - March 10, 2006

  19. Hi to everybody, I’m Sadie Kilpatrick, and I’m from Atlanta GA. Do you know there is a cool WP plug in that lets surfers subscribe to rss feeds by email!

    Comment by business plans — March 25, 2006 @ 5:50 pm - March 25, 2006

  20. Dan Blatt is brilliant!

    Comment by BunnyWunny — August 1, 2007 @ 12:48 pm - August 1, 2007

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