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No dearth of conservative leaders in 2012

Four years ago, appearing on PJTV the night of the election, I said that Rush Limbaugh had then become the interim leader of the conservative movement. Roger Simon, as I recall, disagreed.

In retrospective, I may have had a point. Rush did give a great speech at the following CPAC (2009) challenging the new president and articulating the conservative vision. But, that talker is more a cheerleader and a motivator, than an actual leader. To be sure, he helps us deliver our message and encourages us.

Perhaps Rush came to mind at the time because, in the first eight years of this century, the conservative movement had become increasingly moribund. The Tea Party was not yet born. Few outside Florida had ever heard of Marco Rubio. Bobby Jindal hadn’t even completed his first year as Governor of Louisiana.

Two years later, a whole host of articulate conservatives would rise to the fore, with Bob McDonnell elected Governor of Virginia the following year, then several thoughtful Republicans including Rubio elected to the U.S. Senate, including Ron Johnson from Wisconsin, Rob Portman from Ohio and Pat Toomey from Pennsylvania.

Paul Ryan would soon take over the chairmanship of the House Budget Committee. The Tea Party would become even stronger.

And then, there are the governors committed to reform, including Wisconsin’s Scott Walker, Ohio’s John Kasich, Michigan’s Rick Snyder, New Mexico’s Susana Martinez, South Carolina’s Nikki Haley.

The conservative movement no longer suffers a dearth of political leaders. There now are an abundant amount.

Perhaps now because of his prominence on the campaign trail and his future role in the budgeting process, Paul Ryan will emerge as the next leader of the conservative movement.

The simple fact remains that, although the Republican presidential nominee lost the election to a failed incumbent, the conservative movement is stronger than it was four years ago and ready to do battle.

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15 Comments

  1. Yes, but where are these people in California? Where is OUR Marco Rubio? Ted Cruz? Tim Scott? It is now almost TOTALLY embarassing to be a Republican here in the once Golden State. Yup, I am very frustrated.

    Comment by Mark J. Goluskin — November 12, 2012 @ 12:33 am - November 12, 2012

  2. Great questions, Mark. Where are they?

    We do need Marco Rubio here.

    Comment by B. Daniel Blatt — November 12, 2012 @ 12:51 am - November 12, 2012

  3. Problem is that there would be a lot of people in California who would never vote for a Republican no matter how good they were. Just the letter R after their name on the ballot is bad enough. Seriously. I have heard people say they would never under any circumstances ever vote for a Republican no matter what. It’s just a partisan tool issue in many cases.

    Comment by crosspatch — November 12, 2012 @ 12:56 am - November 12, 2012

  4. What we would have to have is a total meltdown of the state due to Dem policies and then they might consider it. And that might be in the offing here in the next couple of years. I believe this latest round of tax hikes will result in a decline in revenue.

    Comment by crosspatch — November 12, 2012 @ 12:58 am - November 12, 2012

  5. crosspatch, that meltdown is coming. Given the “Yes” Vote for Prop 30 and the overwhelmingly Democratic legislature, one could almost say that the 2012 elections in the (once-)Golden State were little more than a suicide pact.

    Comment by B. Daniel Blatt — November 12, 2012 @ 1:25 am - November 12, 2012

  6. But who? Carly doesn’t live in California anymore. TJ Rodgers (CEO of Cypress Semiconductor)? Is he even a Republican (might be independent).

    Comment by crosspatch — November 12, 2012 @ 2:29 am - November 12, 2012

  7. Ok, Rodgers is Republican. He could do the job but would rankle.

    Comment by crosspatch — November 12, 2012 @ 2:30 am - November 12, 2012

  8. @ Mark: California is going to have to crash and burn before they give Republicans a shot. It probably won’t be in our lifetimes, nor the next generation. It’s a sad state for the State of California.

    Comment by Ryan — November 12, 2012 @ 2:30 am - November 12, 2012

  9. California is going to have to crash and burn before they give Republicans a shot. It probably won’t be in our lifetimes, nor the next generation.

    I wouldn’t be too sure about that. I can’t see California as is being sustainable for very much longer. A crash is imminent.

    Comment by Rattlesnake — November 12, 2012 @ 3:16 am - November 12, 2012

  10. And California liberals always smugly assert: “Don’t be silly. The California economy is the eighth largest in the world, and the Silicon Valley is the center of the technology universe. California is an economic powerhouse and always will be.”

    Someone should tell them that in 1950, Detroit was the wealthiest city in the United States by per capita income.

    Someone should tell them that Argentina was once the most prosperous country in Latin America.

    Not that they would learn anything from those examples.

    Comment by V the K — November 12, 2012 @ 6:02 am - November 12, 2012

  11. BTW, the problem isn’t a lack of conservative leaders, it’s a lack of conservative followers. People who want to work and succeed are outnumbered by people who want to get free stuff from the Government.

    Comment by V the K — November 12, 2012 @ 9:54 am - November 12, 2012

  12. I think Prop 30 (& 39) will serve to accelerate the state’s decline; expect to see a lot of wealthy Californians moving to lower tax states, reducing the state’s tax base. And see small businesses relocate or close up shop.

    Comment by B. Daniel Blatt — November 12, 2012 @ 12:39 pm - November 12, 2012

  13. I live in Pasadena. Now it is the Santa Monica of the San Gabriel valley. Driving down the main drag of Colorado Blvd (yes, the Rose Parade route) over the weekend, I asked the wife if she notices how many businesses are vacant and she said a lot. We are right. There is a news stand/bookstore that has been vacant over five years. And of course, Dems keep winning elections here. Oh yeah, one other aspect of living here is that the hipster, limo libs send their kiddies to private school rather than the PUSD. My hometown is as delusional as the rest of the state. We need an intervention.

    Comment by Mark J. Goluskin — November 13, 2012 @ 2:31 am - November 13, 2012

  14. Mark, lately, I’ve been trying to explain to my liberal friends how Obama/Jerry Brown policies cause entrepreneurs to vacate those storefronts.

    Do wonder if certain people will ever get it — or if they’re just oblivious to economic reality.

    Comment by B. Daniel Blatt — November 13, 2012 @ 2:41 am - November 13, 2012

  15. Well, we have to just keep talking to these people. It will take every last one of us 28 percenters (Cali GOPers) to talk and explain things and yes, maybe change some people’s minds about things.
    It is a LOT OF WORK, but worth it.

    Comment by Mark J. Goluskin — November 16, 2012 @ 1:37 am - November 16, 2012

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