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An Interesting Question

Posted by V the K at 5:10 pm - January 31, 2015.
Filed under: Gay Culture,Liberal Hypocrisy

Mary Cheney wants to know why Minstrel Shows are socially forbidden, but Drag Shows are considered fabulous?

“Why is it socially acceptable — as a form of entertainment — for men to put on dresses, make up and high heels and act out every offensive stereotype of women (bitchy, catty, dumb, slutty, etc.) — but it is not socially acceptable — as a form of entertainment — for a white person to put on blackface and act out offensive stereotypes of African Americans?”

I think the correct liberal answer is, “Because you’re a racist.” But then, that’s pretty much the all-purpose liberal response to any question they don’t have an answer to.

On a related note, a Women’s college recently canceled a performance of The Vajayjay Monologuesostensibly so as not to offend transgendereds, but actually because social justice warriors are just completely bloody insane. (more…)

Wherever There Are Gheys, There Is Drama

Posted by V the K at 10:34 am - January 31, 2015.
Filed under: Gay Culture

All over North Dakota, men are drilling into mudholes. Also, there’s a lot of oil industry activity going on. And, of course, whiny people are whining about both of these things. A journalist traveled to North Dakota to seek out gay men and catalog their whining; because that’s what journalism is about these days.

Attitudes are shifting, but the state’s socially conservative heritage still looms large. Same-sex relationships are often intensely private—if not wholly covert—affairs, and LGBT-friendly spaces remain exasperatingly limited. Online platforms like Grindr provide a means for some gay workers in the area to connect with one another. But the sorts of fleeting and—for the most part—one-on-one interactions they enable don’t do much to break the overall sense of solitude.

Homophobia never lingers far from the surface. “I was at a bar the other night, when this guy started calling me a ‘fucking queer,'” Jon Kelly, a burly 29-year-old real estate developer who moved to Williston four years ago, told me. “I’ve been out for ten years, and nobody’s ever said that to me.”

If you need a whole community of other gay people around you, maybe your place is West Hollywood, not North Dakota. I can’t escape the feeling that the actual gay men who’ve moved out to the oil fields are more comfortable with their environment than Mr. Big City reporter is, and a lot of the discomfort he is projecting is his own.