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As Foretold in Prophecy

Posted by V the K at 1:21 pm - December 2, 2017.
Filed under: Gun Control

The state of Hawaii established a state gun registry to “protect public safety.” They are now using it to confiscate guns. If only someone had warned that a gun registry would be used in exactly this way.

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5 Comments

  1. VtK: I take your point that registration enables confiscation but I have to side with Hawaii on this. Gun registration only snags the law-abiding but they have it because voters, through their reps, enacted registration. Elections have consequences as they say.

    I’d add to that the position of most of us on the right is “no more laws; enforce those already on the books”.

    As cannabis remains a Schedule I substance, it’s illegal as is every other substance on Schedule I. If states start to pick and choose which federal law is to be observed, we end up with things like non-enforcement of immigration law (oh, sorry, that’s already happened). What’s to stop a state legalizing other banned substances (DDT, Quaalude, LSD, or “bath salts”)?

    IMHO, cannabis should have been placed on Schedule II long ago. It’s not anywhere near as dangerous as legal opioid drugs.

    It’s claimed that it’s not efficacious and prone to abuse. See above for abuse and there are plenty of drugs on the market, Schedule II included, that aren’t particularly efficacious.

    There are people, though, for whom it obviously provides some benefit. Allowing it to be prescribed through the usual channels would provide some regulation and accountability and make its (potential) benefits available to all.

    My father does not live in a state that allows medical cannabis use. Suffering from peripheral neuropathy, worsening with age, he takes Lyrica to manage the pain. For him, it’s not all that effective, it’s expensive, and Lyrica can be abused. There is some evidence that pot provides significant relief for some patients.

    He’d like to try cannabis to see if it’s any better but can’t as he doesn’t travel in circles where he comes into contact with dealers (who may adulterate the stuff).

    For OTC sale, I’d say that Colorado, et. al., should be watched for a couple more years. Since they allow OTC sale, may as well use them as an experiment.

    Comment by KCRob — December 2, 2017 @ 3:30 pm - December 2, 2017

  2. I will agree to the extent that people who elect fascists should not be surprised when fascists behave like fascists.

    Comment by V the K — December 2, 2017 @ 3:38 pm - December 2, 2017

  3. Hawaii elects Liberals and Utra Liberals so this is an example of “be careful of what you wish (vote)for”.

    Comment by fortdixmike — December 3, 2017 @ 12:44 pm - December 3, 2017

  4. For OTC sale, I’d say that Colorado, et. al., should be watched for a couple more years. Since they allow OTC sale, may as well use them as an experiment.

    This is already happening, and results are mixed so far. So mixed, that in the 2016 election—where multiple states had cannabis legalization measures on the ballot—the opponents to legalization in Arizona used ads with the former Republican governor of Colorado and a former Democrat mayor of Denver [who, as an aside, has a gay stepson with a history of drug issues] giving their voice to naysayers. AZ was one of the few states in which such legalization failed.

    I live in a neighboring state to Colorado and frequently travel there, so I have seen the implementation of Amendment 64 [the enabling legislation] first hand. This fall I’ve also had the opportunity to visit two other states with legal marijuana use for all purposes [Nevada & Oregon]. The results, to me, are pretty much the same. The pro-drug side has so convinced the general populace that marijuana is so safe, proponents believe it’s almost a crime that it should be regulated at all. Tobacco use is frowned upon, but cannabis use is now ‘cool’. Outdoor and public consumption of cannabis remains illegal in all three states, but visit the Las Vegas Strip, downtown Portlandia, or many places in Central Denver and you’d never know it. At the city-owned public park in downtown Denver popular for street festivals (including the post-parade activities for Denver’s pride celebration), a decade-long public festival on April 20 each year (where plumes of illegal smoke give the impression to the unaware that a huge BBQ is taking place) is now up in the air for 2018 and the subject of multiple legal actions because the organizers left the park on April 21st 2017 much as you’d expect a massive gathering of potheads would. [The permit holder claims a contractor was responsible for not properly removing garbage and ensuring “as you found it” conditions were met.]

    Meanwhile, cannabis advocates are still unhappy with the current situation. Taxes are too high, restrictions on visitor purchases—limited to 50% of resident purchases—are too great, indoor smoking in public spaces is banned (as it is with tobacco), and alcohol licensees are not permitted to have anything to do with the manufacture, sale, or consumption of anything cannabis. The business of cannabis is becoming a bigger business and those in the business claim that all the restrictions are hurting tourism and slowing their roll, dude. Plus, employers are still allowed to legally discriminate against cannabis users via employment or pre-employment drug testing. Oh, the humanity!

    What the advocates don’t talk about (or claim are made-up stories by opponents) is that many of the factors which were promoted as solving societal ills via legalization haven’t occurred. The black market has not subsided (now Mexican drug gangs are using the legalization to undercut prices and supplement their own out-of-state grow operations), and crimes against legal growers and sellers are commonplace (mostly burglaries and armed robberies). Pop-up meth labs are primarily a thing of the past, but are now replaced by often illegal hash oil operations and the resulting explosions by the improper handling of the substance. The influx of newcomers to the state aren’t the civil libertarians with high-paying jobs who just like to chill in their off hours that the promoters of legalization promised. In 2016, a twentysomething guy pulled a piece of PVC pipe off of a construction truck in downtown Denver and was videoed attacking passersby with it until he was apprehended. The jailhouse interview by local media showed that he had diagnosed psychiatric conditions (bipolar disorder and mild schizophrenia, if memory serves correctly) and admitted that he didn’t like his meds prescribed for the conditions and so came to Colorado to self-medicate with marijuana. Unfortunately for him and the people he came into contact with on that particular day, Mary Jane didn’t turn him into a mellow human plush toy who just wanted to chill for as long as possible. That is just one instance; there are multiple stories which are reported but also pooh-poohed and disregarded because “this is what freedom tastes like”, as a toker who—illegally—lit up on the steps of the state capitol the day after passage of the enabling legislation proclaimed. Add to that the situation where law enforcement has had to create a whole new set of protocols to determine just what constitutes impaired driving, since there is no ‘breathalyzer’ test for cannabis usage. (Curiously, ambulance chasing barristers run plenty of ads in Colorado for those who may have been injured by “distracted driving” yet are too cowardly to seek clients for the impact of stoned driving.)

    The much ballyhooed tax revenue is also a mirage. While Colorado takes in approximately $30 million each year (though rising) via cannabis taxes, it’s a drop in the bucket in a multi-billion dollar state budget. (By comparison, Wyoming makes $200 million each year from alcohol sales, as a liquor control state.) Fortunately, the otherwise milquetoast governor has dedicated efforts to divert a portion of taxes to a campaign against underage drug use, so there’s some positive use of those outrageously high taxes on a simple plant.

    While personally I take a libertarian approach to drug use (ie, do what you want, as long as you don’t harm anyone else AND have enough personal resources to counter any results of what you do), it’s clear to me that the current trend towards total legalization (“regulate marijuana like alcohol”) isn’t a good one, overall. This is not to say that there can’t be some improvement in the way cannabis is viewed and regulated—I’m for reclassifying it as a Schedule II substance—as well as further qualified medical testing. The medical correspondent for a Denver TV station claims that the Federal classification of cannabis is the primary reason valid scientific testing can’t effectively be performed. This is unfortunate, since many of the hyperbolic claims of cannabis proponents can’t be proved or disproved until this changes. In the meantime, medical marijuana “licenses” are pretty much a joke, since there is no scientific evidence in the United States of its effectiveness—just a lot of hype. At the same time, I have never talked to anyone in addiction medicine who thinks cannabis legalization as practiced in states like Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and Nevada is a good idea.

    I feel for those whose physical maladies may indeed be helped by cannabis consumption and it’s my view that they should be allowed to pursue that avenue for relief of their symptoms, particularly if they are aged and otherwise not a threat to society via their use of the substance. I’m not sure how best to enable that under the current climate, particularly when those who may be most in need of the drug are in the least possible condition to obtain it on their own.

    Comment by RSG — December 3, 2017 @ 2:44 pm - December 3, 2017

  5. KCRob “I have to side with Hawaii on this. Gun registration only snags the law-abiding but they have it because voters, through their reps, enacted registration. Elections have consequences as they say.

    As cannabis remains a Schedule I substance, it’s illegal as is every other substance on Schedule I. If states start to pick and choose which federal law is to be observed, we end up with things like non-enforcement of immigration law (oh, sorry, that’s already happened).”

    You are correct on the law, but I think it is certain that Hawaii is going after these medical marijuana users only because the law gives them an excuse to do so. If there was no Second Amendment Hawaii would strip every citizen of all firearms (except, of course, for Democrat politicians and their bodyguards and cronies.)

    Comment by pst314 — December 3, 2017 @ 4:33 pm - December 3, 2017

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