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The Left Is a Movement of Buzz Killingtons

Posted by V the K at 9:10 am - February 8, 2018.
Filed under: Political Correctness

Yesterday, SpaceX successfully launched its Falcon Heavy rocket into space, carrying a ballast payload that… just for fun… consisted of a red Tesla Roadster with an empty spacesuit strapped in the front seat. Most people thought this was pretty cool.

But not to Buzz Killingtons like Nathan Robinson at the far-left The Guardian, who felt the need to virtue-signal How Much He Cares About Important Things:  Why Elon Musk’s SpaceX launch is utterly depressing:

There is, perhaps, no better way to appreciate the tragedy of 21st-century global inequality than by watching a billionaire spend $90m launching a $100,000 car into the far reaches of the solar system.

Musk said he wanted to participate in a space race because “races are exciting” and that while strapping his car to a rocket may be “silly and fun … silly and fun things are important”. Thus, anyone who mentions the colossal waste the project involves, or the various social uses to which these resources could be put, can be dismissed as a killjoy.

Yeah, Buzz Killington, you are a killjoy. Because those “Syrian Refugees” you virtue signal about in your piece were going to be in exactly the same situation if Elon Musk didn’t fire off his rocket. And as for income inequality, the socialism you advocate levels it by making 99% of the populations of Cuba, Venezuela, and Zimbabwe miserably impoverished while the political elite are billionaires. You sure don’t seem to have a problem with Fidel Castro, Hugo Chavez, and Robert Mugabe being billionaires.

I will agree with Buzz Killington on one point, though.

Musk’s empire is fueled by billions of dollars in government subsidies. The Los Angeles Times revealed in 2015 that Musk’s companies benefitted from “grants, tax breaks, factory construction, discounted loans and environmental credits”, plus the tax credits and rebates that are granted to consumers for buying his products.

The average household income of a Tesla purchaser is in the hundreds of thousands, yet the federal government pays people $7,500 to buy them through tax credits, and many states offer their own cash handouts. Because we’re all giving Elon Musk money, what he chooses to do with that money is very much our business.

And just where do Elon Musk’s tax breaks and payouts come from? Leftists who felt the need to virtue-signal about concern for the environment by creating those very policies. You guys hate the free market and were convinced it would never lead to your Green Socialist Utopia. So, you guys… YOU GUYS… created the policies that diverted taxpayer funds into Elon Musk’s bank account. But that was okay, because Environmentalism is your secular religion; and you have no problem with the State supporting that.

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16 Comments

  1. I have no issue with multibillionaires like Elon Musk spending their money on fun stuff like rockets and I’m a little miffed that I didn’t get in on his flamethrower promotion (Lord knows I’ve blown $500 on far less useful stuff). But I get a little concerned that the cult of personality around some of these nouveau riche clouds the judgement of people who would otherwise treat a lot of the claims with a healthy dose of skepticism.

    Take his hyperloop concept, which aims to revolutionize personal travel (and even freight transport!) and make highways, airplanes, and lowly trains a thing of the past. I’ve seen people breathlessly pant about this online as if the promised flying cars from The Jetsons will be made irrelevant by such an invention. EM himself has said that he received “verbal approval” from the Federal government to start exploring an installation along the Northeast Corridor, the most congested area of the United States. Yet anyone who has dealt with governmental agencies and right-of-way issues will be happy to explain that isn’t how things work. “Verbal approval” means diddly squat and once you start getting your hands dirty in the messy business of construction on and under the ground in densely populated areas, you quickly find out why many who have gone before have gone bankrupt doing similar projects and those who have succeeded have had to sell their souls and dispose of a few bodies along the way to make it happen.

    The Polyannas who believe he could actually do it will point to the success of Space X and Tesla Motors. The former has had its hiccups but otherwise seems to have done pretty well, but the latter is riddled with issues. The fourth-quarter net loss has more than quintupled and the company burns through cash at a rate that make the big spenders in state capitals like Sacramento envious. Production problems persist and the product itself increases demand on an already burdened electrical grid, as all the solar panels and wind farms in existence won’t be able to charge all the battery-powered vehicles he hopes to put on the streets and roads of the world. That’s not even taking into account the fact that the battery technology itself is powered by impoverished people (including kids) who mine the limited resources needed to make it happen. Yet you’d think that it all happens through the miracle of Mother Nature and wheatgrass and eco-friendly bamboo.

    All that is bad enough, but the fact that it largely occurs through the benevolent largess of public funding should make anyone who thinks that this is a modern miracle think again, regardless of their feelings towards the moneyed rich.

    Comment by RSG — February 8, 2018 @ 11:48 am - February 8, 2018

  2. Big money hangs with big money.

    What is surprising is how many socialists believe that big money is anxious to live a lower middle class existence because unicorns, social justice, equality and l-o-v-e.

    Equally as silly is the notion that the “underclass” is ready, willing and able to take on the rights and responsibilities of lower middle class societal concerns.

    What do you suppose causes such perfect harmony? So far, soothing promises, welfare “assistance” and communistic fairy tales have not done the trick.

    There must be a magic land where the rock candy mountain and the ice cream trees and the dogs with rubber teeth and the blue birds sing you into heaven on earth. I only wish those who worship the place would set sail and leave the rest of the hell alone.

    Comment by Heliotrope — February 8, 2018 @ 12:21 pm - February 8, 2018

  3. My understanding of the car is that Space X needed a heavy payload of some kind for this test. The car was fun and fit the other requirements.

    And Space X is not a pure vanity project. They deliver payloads to the International Space Station.

    Comment by TheQuietMan — February 8, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - February 8, 2018

  4. OT —

    We were having such a romantic afternoon making love on the perfumed back seat of the Tesla…

    … then they kicked us out of the showroom.

    Comment by Cyril J. — February 8, 2018 @ 4:54 pm - February 8, 2018

  5. If Elon Musk wasn’t a bigger welfare queen than Latrina I would have no problem with it.

    That being said some stupid people put a disco ball in orbit a month or 2 ago and it’s messing up real science. They put it up so all humanity could look at their ball.
    http://www.iflscience.com/space/astronomers-are-pissed-off-about-that-disco-ball-satellite-in-orbit/

    Comment by Steve — February 8, 2018 @ 6:52 pm - February 8, 2018

  6. @5

    Exactly.

    Now if Elon The Frugal could do it again without $4.9 billion subsidies, maybe that would be something worth of genuine consideration.

    http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-hy-musk-subsidies-20150531-story.html

    Comment by Cyril J. — February 8, 2018 @ 7:35 pm - February 8, 2018

  7. Accordingly, if only president Trump could shut the spigots to Elon The Frugal — that’d be a wondrous thing to behold.

    Er.. sorry, nope. Not in space science.

    Rater, in Econ 101.

    Comment by Cyril J. — February 8, 2018 @ 7:43 pm - February 8, 2018

  8. * Rather, in Econ 101.

    Comment by Cyril J. — February 8, 2018 @ 7:44 pm - February 8, 2018

  9. Just sayin’

    With $4.9 billion in subsidies, pretty sure even someone as bright as Frederica Wilson (Dom, FL) could find a way to set one of her hats into orbit.

    Or, ya know, at least buy a CNN segment to “report” about “it”.

    Comment by Cyril J. — February 8, 2018 @ 7:56 pm - February 8, 2018

  10. Manned space exploration is one of those things that requires government spending. The pay back is so far into the future that any corporation with stockholders would skin the CEO who suggested it. ( Hey, let’s mine the Moon and build a colony in space!) I am not sure that the Falcon rocket is going to get the job done, long term. What’s amazing to me is the number of people who think that Elon Musk is some kind of super business man. He mainly just seems to be a showman ,who is a government contractor. But it is a interesting rocket.

    Comment by Matthew the Oilman — February 8, 2018 @ 9:06 pm - February 8, 2018

  11. @10

    The pay back is so far into the future that any corporation with stockholders would skin the CEO who suggested it

    I kinda hear what you say but the little detail devil in me can’t help but argue that if there were not so much corporate money wasted on environment “friendly” / “sustainable” cars that take longer to be built than for Bernie Sanders to acquire a new mansion, maybe we would have already seen some big corporation willing to beat NASA at their own game and still generate profits.

    My little pinky tells me it’s not unreasonable to think that a $10 trillion of new public debt in just 8 years was still, likely, an order of magnitude more spendthrift than what Adam Smith’s invisible hand would have done — win or lose — with voluntary investments vs misdirected “ones”.

    Problem is, we’ll never know, after the fact (Except for our Michael Moore or Sean Penn economic experts, of course)

    Thank you Obama the Cool.

    Comment by Cyril J. — February 8, 2018 @ 10:31 pm - February 8, 2018

  12. * with private voluntary investments in space

    Comment by Cyril J. — February 8, 2018 @ 10:33 pm - February 8, 2018

  13. What’s China up to in space?

    Comment by Frank — February 9, 2018 @ 4:58 am - February 9, 2018

  14. @13 Probably on a top secret humanitarian mission initiated by Pope Francis

    Comment by Cyril J. — February 9, 2018 @ 1:39 pm - February 9, 2018

  15. Actually the coolest part of the whole thing was the booster rockets going up and setting back down like synchronized swimmers. Shooting the car into space just seemed a little bit of vanity but I admire the engineering and technology required. We need to stop staring at our navels,ruminating over PC crap and move towards the stars.

    Comment by Rex — February 10, 2018 @ 10:13 am - February 10, 2018

  16. What’s amazing to me is the number of people who think that Elon Musk is some kind of super business man. He mainly just seems to be a showman ,who is a government contractor.

    Bingo. To many, he’s a 21st Century Thomas Edison. But Edison had rich friends to bankroll his ideas. Elon Musk is someone who has appeared to have two really good ideas, one of which has received large amounts of public funding (via gov’t contracts). The rest seem to be follies of an independently wealthy person with a lot of time on their hands.

    Comment by RSG — February 10, 2018 @ 12:15 pm - February 10, 2018

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