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  1. I heard this same thing on the radio this morning and it’s just stunning to me. You can’t win if you don’t show up for the game. Pathetic.

    Comment by Hunter — November 7, 2012 @ 10:02 am - November 7, 2012

  2. And that’s why all the optimism of recent

    Comment by V the K — November 7, 2012 @ 10:04 am - November 7, 2012

  3. Weeks was Om error.

    Comment by V the K — November 7, 2012 @ 10:04 am - November 7, 2012

  4. I was pretty amazed to see Romney pulling in fewer votes than McCain, given how charged up the base has been over the last few days and how famously uninspiring McCain was in ’08. I haven’t looked at all the numbers, but I’m guessing that a good chunk of the drop-off in GOP votes from 2008 was from Latino votes that McCain won. It’s also possible that more evangelicals and Catholics than we’d like to admit refused to vote for Mitt on account of Mormonism. In any case, it’s sad that more people didn’t come out for Mitt. Obviously, the large and much-deserved drop-off in votes for Obama made yesterday a missed opportunity. And yet I’m not sure who would have been a better nominee, at least among those running last year.

    Comment by chad — November 7, 2012 @ 10:12 am - November 7, 2012

  5. How many votes did Gary Johnson siphon off?

    Comment by Edward — November 7, 2012 @ 10:16 am - November 7, 2012

  6. So… Willard Mittens didn’t turn out the GOP base. Interesting.

    Comment by ILoveCapitalism — November 7, 2012 @ 10:25 am - November 7, 2012

  7. Sorry for being OT, but Dan, I imagine you’ll blog about the state ballot initiatives that went in favor of SSM. Regardless of whether one supports or opposes SSM, this obviously signals a fairly major shift in favor of SSM, even if it occurred in blue states. The idea that the GOP can continue outspoken opposition to SSM without facing electoral consequences seems to be evaporating rapidly. It seems that is mostly bad news for the GOP, which is probably going to be reluctant to give up on the issue, but it may also free up Republicans on the issue who aren’t inclined to oppose SSM anyway. In any case, it would be interesting to get your take.

    Comment by chad — November 7, 2012 @ 10:28 am - November 7, 2012

  8. chad, yeah, post on marriage initiatives on the agenda.

    Have some thoughts on it, related to what you just said about blue states. Even then, seems the margins were narrow.

    Comment by B. Daniel Blatt — November 7, 2012 @ 10:31 am - November 7, 2012

  9. Also, the GOP was almost completely silent on social issues this time, while the Cult essentially ran on nothing else.

    Comment by V the K — November 7, 2012 @ 10:42 am - November 7, 2012

  10. This points to a late surge by Obama. I’m not sure why, but maybe Chris Christie’s criticism of Romney’s aides and praise of Obama, and Mike Bloomberg’s late endorsement of Obama helped. Sandy is the November surprise. Perhaps the slight improvement of the jobs report (below 8%).

    Overall, perhaps Romney didn’t do enough to counter Obama’s ground game and coalition campaign. Romney didn’t have the traditional conservative coalition that Bush did. He didn’t court the Hispanics or Women.

    I’m a minority voter of Romney and I’m disappointed. Now, Obamacare will NEVER be repealed. Taxes will go up. Defense spending will be cut. More people will be on welfare. More illegal immigration will occur. Have a fun four years.

    Comment by anon322531 — November 7, 2012 @ 10:44 am - November 7, 2012

  11. I agree with chad re. Mormonism. During the campaign, I was surprised it wasn’t made more of an issue (and I was pleased) but perhaps Romney’s religion influenced voters once they were in their voting booths. I also think some Gingrich supporters are still upset, he being the first choice for many evangelicals. Perhaps a sizable percentage stayed home (sizable meaning enough to make a difference), influencing other races and initiatives such as ssm and marijuana legalization.

    Comment by Ignatius — November 7, 2012 @ 11:12 am - November 7, 2012

  12. I’ve been scanning some liberal blogs and mainstream news sites (actually, mainstream news sites have become liberal blogs) and the gloating in the comments sections is ugly. Damn. Talk about sore winners…

    Comment by Ignatius — November 7, 2012 @ 11:20 am - November 7, 2012

  13. Honestly, what would the comments be like in conservative blogs had Obama lost? You think there would be any less gloating (starting with here). Here is my take on the Presidential election: the better candidate, with the more appealing platform, won. You can blame Christie, or Sandy, or whatever else you want, but Obama was leading, and was predicted to win, for the entire duration of the election, and those predictions, once again, proved entirely correct. Romney had one burst of momentum after one bad debate by Obama, but he effectively cured that by outperforming Romney in the next two debates. You can choose to accept that, or continue to live in a state of denial for another four years, just like after the last election, when you had a spate of different execuses for why your guy lost. It comes down to, again, the better candidate won.

    I am unsurprised, but still disappointed, like some other commentators here that one of your lead stories today is not about the most significant historic day for gay rights in American political history. A President who supports gay marriage and has championed a wide variety of gay rights initiatives won reelection. Even if you don’t like him in all other respects, that is significant. A gay Senator was elected in a swing state. That is significant. Gay rights ballot initiatives when four for four, and a judge who supported gay rights kept his seat in what was essentially a fifth referendum election. The worm has turned, and this should be a cause for celebration on this blog, even if every … single … red state continues to be behind the eight ball on this fundamental issue of freedom.

    Comment by Jeff — November 7, 2012 @ 11:49 am - November 7, 2012

  14. Perhaps the slight improvement of the jobs report (below 8%).

    Does anyone with half a brain really expect this number to not get revised upward now that the narcissist has won reelection?

    I’ve been scanning some liberal blogs and mainstream news sites (actually, mainstream news sites have become liberal blogs) and the gloating in the comments sections is ugly. Damn. Talk about sore winners…

    I can handle gloating, what I can’t handle is all the “Republicans are mean, they hate brown people, the GOP is dead forever” crap.

    I can’t even go to my own facebook page, because it is filled with crap about how wonderful our nation is going to be now that we have abortions and birth control pills for all, but the president they all just voted for is driving our country off the fiscal cliff.

    It’s like admiring the beauty of the fall leaves while driving straight into a head on collision with a mack truck.

    Comment by Just Me — November 7, 2012 @ 11:59 am - November 7, 2012

  15. A gay Senator was elected in a swing state.

    If said gay senator was conservative, I might see reason to rejoice, but instead we get another robot to march in lock step with Harry Reid and the narcissist in chief.

    Nope, not going to rejoice over that one.

    Comment by Just Me — November 7, 2012 @ 12:01 pm - November 7, 2012

  16. “A President who supports gay marriage and has championed a wide variety of gay rights initiatives won reelection.”

    Yeah, I can see that. Gay rights isn’t much of a negative with Hispanics and Blacks. This is a significant change. The religious right was non-existent in this campaign. Even the Mormons were silent. I wondered what happened.

    The “War on Women” turned out to be a brilliant campaign. It was unbelievable, yet Akins and Mordock turned a caricature into the reality. Rush Limbaugh’s slut accusation became a rallying cry.

    A Black President was reelected, but two Black Republicans lost. This suggests people don’t elect minority Republicans. What bigots. Perhaps if Republicans were to attract more minorities, it would have to be more than skin deep. Republicans need to reevaluate its messages and legislation to appeal to minorities. Then it will be more competitive.

    Comment by anon322531 — November 7, 2012 @ 12:24 pm - November 7, 2012

  17. Here is my take on the Presidential election: the better candidate, with the more appealing platform, won.

    That’s a very revealing statement.

    We should remember what Obama’s platform and pattern actually was.

    After 2010, the numbers were crunched, and it was clear that Obama and the Democrats could not win a mainstream campaign. Instead, they targeted narrow groups, stirred up conflicts over issues aimed at that group, whether it was union pensions, racism or birth control. There was no more pretense of a national election, only a frenzied rush to polarize as many groups as possible and join them together into an acrimonious coalition, not so much for anything, as against Republicans.

    There isn’t any inspiration here. Just paranoia over everything from gay marriage to abortion to racial profiling to illegal immigration. A dozen illegal benefits being handed out with the explicit threat that they will be lost if Romney wins. A dozen mini-civil wars being stirred up to divide Americans and set them at each other’s throats for the benefit of the Obama campaign.

    From Occupy Wall Street to Wisconsin, from Trayvon Martin to Chick-fil-A, the goal of these manufactured conflicts has been to divide and conquer the electorate by emphasizing group rights over individual economic welfare.

    And that’s what we see here. What was “Jeff’s” reason for supporting Obama and his Obama Party?

    A President who supports gay marriage and has championed a wide variety of gay rights initiatives won reelection. Even if you don’t like him in all other respects, that is significant. A gay Senator was elected in a swing state. That is significant. Gay rights ballot initiatives when four for four, and a judge who supported gay rights kept his seat in what was essentially a fifth referendum election.

    And that brings us to the main point of Sultan Knish’s argument.

    There is not a single Obama voter anywhere in the land who believes that another four years of him will make this country better. Not a single one from coast to coast. No, what they believe is that he will make the country a worse place for those people that they hate. That he will have four more years to sink their ideas deeper in the earth, regardless of how many families go hungry and how many fathers kill themselves because they can no longer take care of their families. What they believe is that Obama will grant their group more special privileges and the rest of the country can go to hell.

    And that’s what we see with “Jeff’s” red state bashing.

    Fortunately, from this point forward, everything that goes wrong is “Jeff’s” fault. We voted, we advocated for sanity, and “Jeff” threw it away so he could make life worse for Christians and people in red states.

    Your portfolio and retirement account are collapsing? Too bad, you wanted gay-sex marriage instead.

    You lost your job? Too bad, you wanted gay-sex marriage instead.

    Your taxes are going up? Too bad, you wanted gay-sex marriage instead.

    Americans got killed in a terrorist attack? Too bad, you wanted gay-sex marriage instead.

    This is my answer to “Jeff” and his ilk from this point forward. They voted based on their grievance group status, and if they want help, they can wave their gay-sex marriage certificates and beg their Obamamessiah for it.

    Comment by North Dallas Thirty — November 7, 2012 @ 12:28 pm - November 7, 2012

  18. Lower turnout does not seem consistent with the many reports from across the country that lines were unusually long at the polls. What’s going on?

    Comment by matthew49 — November 7, 2012 @ 12:37 pm - November 7, 2012

  19. I wrote on here several months back that this election should be about repealing Obamacare. If Romney hammered away at that and presented a credible plan to repeal and replace, he would win. Not only did Romney fail to do that, he failed to give specifics about any plan. He spoke mostly in platitudes, just as Obama did 4 years ago. Not to mention Romney is a flip-flopper who isn’t to be trusted with anything he says. I voted for him, but it may be a blessing that he did not win and further tarnish the Republican brand. We can spend 4 more years down the path the European-style socialism. Maybe then the country will be ready for a President Ryan/Rubio/Jindal/fill-in-the-blank with your favorite.

    Comment by Eddie — November 7, 2012 @ 12:39 pm - November 7, 2012

  20. Ignatius, why are you surprised? These are the same people who were sore winners in 2008 — did any of us honestly expect them to have learned anything in 4 years, especially if they were re-electing the most petty, thin-skinned liar to hold the office of POTUS?

    I’m just wondering when the expiration date on “blame Bush” is — it’ll be interesting to see him and his followers move the goalposts again, despite “inheriting” his own economy of the past four years.

    Comment by Acethepug — November 7, 2012 @ 12:39 pm - November 7, 2012

  21. Ace, above I expressed surprise that Romney’s Mormonism wasn’t made more of an issue (and I expressed pleasure that it wasn’t). But I didn’t express surprise that Obama supporters are sore winners — I’m just expressing distaste. That doesn’t surprise me in the least! I think Obama’s ‘revenge’ comment was very revealing and might not have been so off-the-cuff as some of us might have assumed.

    Comment by Ignatius — November 7, 2012 @ 12:48 pm - November 7, 2012

  22. Chad raises some interesting questions, but I have a different take. I wonder if the fall off was due to complacency. Too many (like me but I voted) listening to the pundits predicting a landslide that their attitude became why bother? Mitt´s victory is a for gone conclusion. There was far more entusiasm for Mitt than for McCain which cast doubt on Chad´s speculation. Will we ever know the real reason?

    Comment by Roberto — November 7, 2012 @ 1:47 pm - November 7, 2012

  23. North Dallas Thirty, every word you utter is incorrect, and every word you speak just betrays your hatred, your ignorance, your inability to see two sides of an issue. Fortunately, twice, more than half the country disagrees with you. I am an Obama supporter who thinks he is better for the country, far better, than the alternative. I think this country is better by not taking money from Pell Grants and food stamps and Medicare in order to fund an even bigger military and to keep tax cuts for the rich that haven’t helped the economy in any way. I believe the country is better if we invest in infrastructure and in teachers. I believe the country is better if we protect gay rights. I believe the ocuntry is better if we don’t demonize Latinos and we provide a path to citizenship for those brought here as children from other countries. I believe the country is better if indiivduals, not the government, make choices about their own bodies and their own sexuality. I believe the country is better if we adopt the policies that led to growth under both Clinton and Obama, rather than the policies that led our country to the brink of fiscal ruin under Bush. I believe our country is better off with people who believe government CAN do good, not have no faith in that whatsoever, because what happens then is the Katrina response. I believe Obama kept us safer (actually, this is a demonstrable fact) from Bush did from terrorism, both at home and abroad. I believe that we should use military intervention as a last resort, not as a default option, and should instead spend that money at home. I believe that human-caused global warming is not a myth and that we should adopt environmentally responsible policies. I believe that Obama’s stimulus and the bail-out saved the country from ruin and that things would have been far worse off, rather than (in contrast to Europe and most of Asias) on the modest growth path we are now on. I could go on and on and on. I have no animus towards anyone, other than bigots. I believe that Obama more captures what America stands for than the modern GOP. You can disagree with all of those facts. I know that you do. That is your right. But your assumptions about my motivations, and about the 51 percent of the country who voted for the President, ar esimply wrong. Try actually getting to know a liberal in the flesh at some point, rather than demonizing us based on what you see on Fox News and hear from Rush Limbaugh. It’s all bullshit, and nowhere near reality.

    Comment by Jeff — November 7, 2012 @ 1:50 pm - November 7, 2012

  24. There are basically two groups of people who oppose Mormonism: traditional Christians (Protestants and Catholics) and secularists. And each group opposes for different reasons. Secularists find Mormonism too socially conservative and traditional and basically worthy of mockery. Democratic politicians dare not explicitly mock or denigrate Mormons, but some of their pundit allies have no hesitation to do so. But such people weren’t going to vote for Romney anyway. Christian critics of Mormonism are much more nuanced in their opposition to Mormonism, since they are generally allied culturally and politically, even though they (including myself) have big disagreements over theology. Most conservative Christians had great respect for Romney and thought for the good of the country Romney needed to win. But I wouldn’t doubt that a great many Christians held Romney’s Mormonism against him. They may have done so quietly, not wanting to be criticized by fellow conservatives for aiding Obama’s reelection, but they may have nevertheless felt it wrong to vote for a Mormon. I’m just theorizing here, but I can easily imagining this be the case. I hope I’m wrong. Theologically, I have huge disagreement with Mormons, but I would always proudly vote for one when I believe the person to be the best person running, just as I did yesterday.

    On an unrelated note, I hope we can quickly get passed the finger pointing, talking about who needs to be banished and whatnot. We need social conservatives, libertarians, national security conservatives, fiscal conservatives, Tea partiers, establishment Republicans, gay Republicans, minority Republicans, urban Republicans, rural Republicans, young, old, and anyone else who thinks the Democratic party is bad for America to make peace with each other and work together. Democrats are much better than us at holding together coalitions of people with diverse motivations and experiences. This doesn’t mean we all get our way; we can’t. But we should at least look for how we can bring people in rather than shoving them out.

    Comment by chad — November 7, 2012 @ 2:13 pm - November 7, 2012

  25. I am an Obama supporter who thinks he is better for the country, far better, than the alternative. I think this country is better by not taking money from Pell Grants and food stamps and Medicare in order to fund an even bigger military and to keep tax cuts for the rich that haven’t helped the economy in any way.

    Of course, Jeff.

    That’s because you are a taker, not a maker.

    Tax cuts for “the rich” represent money that you want redistributed to you because you think you “deserve” it more than the people who have it.

    You haven’t a clue about what that person did with their money or how they earned it. You have no idea how hard they worked or how they came into it. All you see is that they have more than you do and you want Mommy to take it away from them and give it to you.

    But of course, are Jeff and his fellow Obama supporters going to abide by the tax laws? Of course not.

    And is Jeff going to actually spend that money on the poor? Of course not; just as with Jon Corzine, you can steal billions as long as you’re a good “progressive” who supports gay-sex marriage.

    That is the reality, Jeff. You and your fellow Obama supporters don’t care about anything other than screwing everyone else over. All you care about is punishing those people who a) make more than you and b) disagree with you.

    You see government as a blunt instrument of force to punish others for being different and more successful than you are. That is fascism. You and your fellow Obama supporters are fascists.

    Comment by North Dallas Thirty — November 7, 2012 @ 2:30 pm - November 7, 2012

  26. chad,

    I agree with everything you wrote above^. Thanks.

    Comment by Ignatius — November 7, 2012 @ 2:35 pm - November 7, 2012

  27. I believe the ocuntry is better if we don’t demonize Latinos and we provide a path to citizenship for those brought here as children from other countries.

    I strongly suspect you anti demonization doesn’t extend to red state dwellers and conservative Christians.

    Also, since you are a Bush hating, red state hating, probably Christian hating pro gay voter, when does the “it was Bush’s fault” end and Obama gets to own the mess he has created?

    Also, Obamacare is going to absolutely kill the working lower middle class-kill them. These are the people whose employers are going to cut their hours to part time to avoid penalties and costs. These are the people who are going to see their insurance sky rocket while their energy, food and housing costs sky rocket.

    Comment by Just Me — November 7, 2012 @ 2:48 pm - November 7, 2012

  28. GOP fired up? Well, maybe by comparison to the way things were when Mitt R. won the nomination.

    But the real problem is the Republicans don’t know who they are, and so the Left is free to paint them anyway they see fit.

    Are the Republicans for smaller government? George W. Bush sure wasn’t. Pundits on the right were beside themselves when the Tea-Party hinted that social issues were no longer central to the issue.

    And as long as the Republicans keep tipping their hats to the anti-gay, anti-abortion crowd, they are going to miss connecting with a very large – and growing – part of the country.

    I think it is interesting that so many anti-same-sex-marriage initiatives went down to defeat. I also think that as long as the GOP keeps beating that dead horse, it will remain a dead horse.

    Comment by Zendo Deb — November 7, 2012 @ 2:50 pm - November 7, 2012

  29. I live in Orange County, CA and there was NO LINE at my voting location. Four years ago, I had to wait 2 hrs in line to vote. If you religious bigots didn’t come out to vote for Romney just because he is a Mormon, you deserve to have EVERY DIME you make TAKEN AWAY to feed to ILLEGALS & the UNION LEECHES.

    Comment by Me — November 7, 2012 @ 2:58 pm - November 7, 2012

  30. If you religious bigots didn’t come out to vote for Romney just because he is a Mormon, you deserve to have EVERY DIME you make TAKEN AWAY to feed to ILLEGALS & the UNION LEECHES.

    Is there actual polling data that it was religious bigots who didn’t come out and vote?

    I only ask this, because while I live in NH I grew up in the south where the Bible Belt reigns supreme, and pretty much anyone I know from back home who is a religious conservative (eg evangelical, protestent with a some mainline baptists thrown in) voted for Romney and did so happily.

    I don’t have a scientific poll though.

    Comment by Just Me — November 7, 2012 @ 3:23 pm - November 7, 2012

  31. Jeff,

    I get tires of you bleeding heart liberals defending illegal immigrants. I live in El Salvador. Illegals from other countries passong through get deported. just as the Mexican army patrolling Mexico´s southern border deport Central and South Americans entering without visas. They can´t get them all but they do get them and deport them. In fact, when I was returning with documents for my residency, I had a discussion with an iummigration officer in the airport who told me El Salvador is a country of laws, if you are not going to obey them you should get on the next plane back to the U.S. There was German who was a permanent resident here for 12 years, and he happened to be a communist. He, as a communist or comsymp, took part in a demonstration march to the Presidential Palace with members of the communist FMLN protesting that after a year in office he failed to implement communism in this country. He was deported by the very government he supported. It gripes me, especially May day, when illegals demand residency now. They are attempting to influence our politics. They should be arrested and deported. If I were to participate in any political activity or demonstration on behalf of the right, I, like the German, would be deported. Until other nations change their policy towards immigrants, legal and illegal, I see no earthly reason for United States to do so.

    Comment by Roberto — November 7, 2012 @ 3:45 pm - November 7, 2012

  32. How many more elections do we have to lose for you to understand that we need a candidate that BRINGS OUT THE CONSERVATIVES? RINOS DO NOT WIN!

    Comment by kyle — November 7, 2012 @ 4:46 pm - November 7, 2012

  33. How many more elections do we have to lose for you to understand that we need a candidate that BRINGS OUT THE CONSERVATIVES?

    I would just once love to see a real conservative run, I would rather lose with a real conservative than lose with a RINO.

    That said, I would like to see the party focus on the economy and fiscal policy. Social issues for me right now just come across as noise and indicate a lack of seriousness to deal with the real problems-like the fiscal cliff.

    Comment by Just Me — November 7, 2012 @ 5:14 pm - November 7, 2012

  34. [...] Why did Mitt Romney fail to get as many votes as did John McCain in 2008? [...]

    Pingback by GayPatriot » The three big questions Republicans should be asking — November 7, 2012 @ 10:54 pm - November 7, 2012

  35. Perhaps a sizable percentage stayed home

    Something that I think supports this is the trend in the Deep South. Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama all trended Democratic this time (i.e. they swung less towards the Republicans than the United States as a whole). South Carolina was also marginal.

    Comment by Rattlesnake — November 7, 2012 @ 11:01 pm - November 7, 2012

  36. Here is my take on the Presidential election: the better candidate, with the more appealing platform, won.

    Argumentum ad populum.

    The worm has turned, and this should be a cause for celebration on this blog, even if every … single … red state continues to be behind the eight ball on this fundamental issue of freedom.

    Not necessarily if you believe in individual rights over “gay rights.”

    Comment by Rattlesnake — November 7, 2012 @ 11:10 pm - November 7, 2012

  37. Rattlesnake, agreed. Even Montana was light red. Yes, Montana. Analysts will be scrutinizing this election for decades, both as a snapshot and as a running video of the electorate.

    Comment by Ignatius — November 8, 2012 @ 2:27 pm - November 8, 2012

  38. Obama almost won Montana in 2008. Romney won it much more comfortably this time (by the way, I’ve already written a long post analyzing some of the data).

    Comment by Rattlesnake — November 8, 2012 @ 3:02 pm - November 8, 2012

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