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  1. Romney was not hurt by his business background; he was hurt by his own reluctance to present/defend what was great about it.

    Comment by ILoveCapitalism — November 7, 2012 @ 10:19 pm - November 7, 2012

  2. ILC, it’s not his business background that hurt him, but the Democrats’ success in tying his finance background to Wall Street. But, he did need to do a better job defending it.

    Comment by B. Daniel Blatt — November 7, 2012 @ 10:26 pm - November 7, 2012

  3. The demographics in the country have changed dramatically. The ward instinct of the Chicago machine is more useful than attempting to run a campaign aimed at Americans and principles and values.

    Obama has successfully Californicated America. He went after each group with special messages that appealed to their wants and feelings. He totally avoided anything resembling an agenda and spent much of his speech content on tearing away at Romney and painting him as The Man who was always the villain in the near past of every one of the groups being courted.

    That is really a very old and tried and true formula for a demagogue. The Republicans have nowhere to go in this game. The tipping point was reached and the country has tipped. We are at the point where the people have gotten a taste of the treasury and they like it and they want more.

    Obama bought millions of votes from unmarried women with a phony crisis over contraceptives.

    When you whore for votes among the easy swayed and misled and you build a winning coalition, what is the other party to do? Preach principles and responsibility?

    From my point of view, I think we are better off to concentrate on Congress and the state officers and let the liberals run the course with their tax and spend mania. They won’t cut, because their pandering and payments for votes will not permit them to cut. They are programed to take us down the path to California and then Greece.

    If there is a way to field a party that can win by any means other than out-pandering the Democrats, I would love to hear the game plan. Remember, it must include appealing to students in liberal colleges, single women, government workers, union members, blacks, hispanics, Puerto Ricans, people who pay no income taxes, and folks who receive a lot of welfare.

    Comment by heliotrope — November 7, 2012 @ 10:36 pm - November 7, 2012

  4. Romney did a poor job at countering the Demoncrats/MFM-promoted narrative. In any decent world, his accomplishments and decency would have been considered admirable qualities.

    But in this perverse world, business success is considered exploitation, and decency is considered old-fashioned and out-of-touch. So, the Democrats and journalist who inherited their money and status attacked him as greedy. And the whores and thieves mocked his morality.

    This is truly a sad state of affairs, isn’t it?

    Comment by V the K — November 7, 2012 @ 10:37 pm - November 7, 2012

  5. ILC, it’s not his business background that hurt him, but the Democrats’ success in tying his finance background to Wall Street. But, he did need to do a better job defending it.

    Let me try again.

    Romney was not hurt by his finance background, nor by the Democrats’ efforts to tie his finance background to Wall Street, but rather, by his own reluctance (or inability?) to present/defend his finance background with moral confidence and clarity, which was the key factor allowing/enabling the Democrats’ ugly attacks on it to succeed.

    Comment by ILoveCapitalism — November 7, 2012 @ 10:55 pm - November 7, 2012

  6. [...] The kind of genuine conservative candidate Republicans need [...]

    Pingback by GayPatriot » Three big questions Republicans should be asking — November 7, 2012 @ 10:55 pm - November 7, 2012

  7. ILC, now, I see what you’re driving at. :-)

    But, I still wonder if some people just saw his finance background and thought “Wall Street.”

    Comment by B. Daniel Blatt — November 7, 2012 @ 10:56 pm - November 7, 2012

  8. I still wonder if some people just saw his finance background and thought “Wall Street.”

    Yeah, but ILC is right–much of seeing finance and thinking Wall Street lay in the inability of Romney, et al., to explain either with moral or economic clarity.

    Eric Hines

    Comment by E Hines — November 7, 2012 @ 11:01 pm - November 7, 2012

  9. heliotrope: Great points. Your comment about Obama’s demagogue strategy is meaty… but I’ve just read a couple blog posts – Rattlesnake, and someone else, maybe Althouse – which remind me of an important point: The U.S. did shift rightward in this election, compared to 2006 and 2008. Are we viewing the glass as half-empty?

    When you whore for votes among the easy swayed and misled and you build a winning coalition, what is the other party to do? Preach principles and responsibility?

    I still entertain some HOPE (so to speak) that, when the now-inevitable hyper-stagflation hits, and the electorate is forced to shift back to genuine issues, it will demand nothing less.

    Comment by ILoveCapitalism — November 7, 2012 @ 11:03 pm - November 7, 2012

  10. Yes, Dan and EH. People have been trained – by the Left, I mean – to automatically think finance == Wall Street == criminal greed. They made a famous movie to build the connection in people’s minds, literally called _Wall Street_. Some different people made a movie to answer the Left’s viewpoint, but it has not caught on as widely, although the novel continues to sell well.

    Comment by ILoveCapitalism — November 7, 2012 @ 11:09 pm - November 7, 2012

  11. I like Jeb Bush, but do you really think a candidate with the Bush name could have won anything? That might be unfair, but I think it is reality.
    Governor Romney was an imperfect candidate , just as we are all imperfect people. Surely he will second guess his instincts, especially wondering whether he should have fought back.After a long primary where he was tarred and feathered, he went on to be undeservedly marginalized and demonized by Obama, particularly in Ohio.
    Mitt Romney is a good man, and it is unbelievable to me that Obama, a little man with ideas antithetical to our founding will be POTUS 4 more years.
    Hopefully between now and 2014 we can figure out how to save the GOP and regain the Senate, and then the prize in 2016…

    Comment by Valerie — November 7, 2012 @ 11:15 pm - November 7, 2012

  12. BTW – Why the heck did Mia Love lose? Was her district that Dem? Was she that poor a candidate? Or was she, as one might expect, targeted very heavily by the Left for elimination?

    And what the heck is going on in WI? They voted Walker, last night they even voted the GOP back into control of their legislature – but they still voted Obama? Liking the GOP enough to cement its grip on the state, but still voting Obama? Who does that? Why?

    Comment by ILoveCapitalism — November 7, 2012 @ 11:18 pm - November 7, 2012

  13. I agree with Dan in theory, but not in practice because I never want another Bush or Clinton in the White House. Ever ever ever ever.

    Comment by Bruce (GayPatriot) — November 7, 2012 @ 11:41 pm - November 7, 2012

  14. I don’t think someone who makes the comments Jeb Bush made about conservatives is a “genuine conservative.”

    You read my post, ILC? Yes, the Republicans made some gains in this election, but I’m still uncertain about what sort of disasters Obama’s second term will create and if those GOP gains were ultimately meaningless. I’m finding it quite hard to figure out what I think about this, actually. There is just too much uncertainty (although, I am quite certain that the economy is not about to get better).

    Mia Love lost by about 2,600 votes. Her district, being in Utah, is overwhelmingly conservative, but Jim Matheson is the incumbent and he is supposedly a popular and conservative Democrat. Additionally, the Libertarian candidate got over 5,000 votes. I really like Mia Love so I am quite disappointed she lost, and considering Romney won Utah by a margin of 48 points, I am surprised as well.

    Comment by Rattlesnake — November 8, 2012 @ 2:06 am - November 8, 2012

  15. And what the heck is going on in WI? They voted Walker, last night they even voted the GOP back into control of their legislature – but they still voted Obama? Liking the GOP enough to cement its grip on the state, but still voting Obama? Who does that? Why?

    I tuned into “On The Record” on FNC tonight just in time to hear that issue being addressed by the guest, already speaking. Since I was listening on satellite radio, I didn’t have a visual or chyron to go with the voice, which I also didn’t recognize, but it turned out to be Governor Scott Walker. He was explaining that historically, WI has always been a very independent state, where people vote for the person, not the party. [Sidebar: remember that this is the home of both Bob LaFollette and Joe McCarthy.]

    So, there comes that “likability” factor again. Personally, if you’re not motivated to focus on policy, and you get hit with a barrage of ads promoting the feel-good persona of the guy with the visible aura and denigrating the evil, greedy, ‘vulture capitalist’, I can see where you might be compelled to vote for the “good” guy rather than Lord Voldemort.

    I know—I can’t wrap my brain around the whole concept, either.

    Comment by RSG — November 8, 2012 @ 2:35 am - November 8, 2012

  16. I don’t buy that Romney wasn’t conservative enough. He said he was going to do away with Obamacare on day one, that was enough for me. To me, it was all about class warfare and entitlements. The entitlement mentality is growing in this country, and it seems more and more people are accepting the government in every aspect of their lives. No, I don’t believe Romney wasn’t far right enough, he wasn’t far left enough, and believes people should take more responsibility for their own lives. How far down the road before we get the demonstrations and riots like the European nations, who just could not bear the cost of socialism, any longer. Woe is the day!

    Comment by Christine — November 8, 2012 @ 6:54 am - November 8, 2012

  17. I wouldn’t say all the alternatives were unacceptable. By the end of the primaries, I found Newt Gingrich to be the most conservative and acceptable choice to lead the country out of the liberal rut, the way he led the House to bring about a balanced budget and reform. Maybe his personal baggage would have been a problem, but in terms of “conservative” leadership, he was my choice. Unfortunately, his campaign chose not to fight back against the smears that Romney’s campaign (and other media like Drudge) threw at him.

    The rest of the candidates, I agree were unacceptable. While a lot of conservatives got behind Santorum, I found him to be more of a RINO than others did, and prone to a lot of verbal missteps (the same thing that sunk Akin). There was something about Bachmann that seemed off to me, like there was something “not there”. Cain wasn’t experienced enough on issues other than business (I’m not counting the sex scandals, in his case, because those could have been trumped up). And Perry had the Gardasil issue.

    Comment by John — November 8, 2012 @ 7:55 am - November 8, 2012

  18. We had a similar issue with Josh Mandel here in Ohio, I believe.

    Sherrod Brown kept harping on how he put ‘inexperienced croneys’ in the State TReasury. I thought he should answer “Yes, my people don’t have what you call ‘experience’. That inexperience has led our state to an upgraded credit rating and a reducing debt. Based on our downgraded credit rating and the inability of the senate to propose a budget since you’ve been in office, Senator, I think we need more ‘inexperience’ in Washington.”

    Brown won, but we also soundly defeated a measure to ‘fix’ redistricting. So it seemed to be a battle of the status quo here.

    Comment by The_Livewire — November 8, 2012 @ 8:12 am - November 8, 2012

  19. I was so sure that at some point MR would have stated flatly that “Romneycare didn’t work” and explain how that in MA, medical services are more expensive and less available than before. Sure, technically, more people are covered, but that only allows the 1% to feel better.

    Time for our side to become more conservative and libertarian.

    Comment by BigJ — November 8, 2012 @ 8:39 am - November 8, 2012

  20. But voters *did* vote with their pocketbooks. Their pocketbooks are government checks. Perhaps all we can reasonably do is continue to advocate for economic freedom and understand that in a truly (or mostly) free market, conservative social values (mostly) take care of themselves, privately.

    Comment by Ignatius — November 8, 2012 @ 11:42 am - November 8, 2012

  21. If there is a way to field a party that can win by any means other than out-pandering the Democrats…it must include appealing to students in liberal colleges, single women, government workers, union members, blacks, hispanics, Puerto Ricans, people who pay no income taxes, and folks who receive a lot of welfare.

    One plan would be actually to talk to these folks:

    The conservative Republicans’ positions are sound. What they need to do is a better job of communicating, a Republican weakness of long-standing. They need actually to approach these groups and talk directly to them in their neighborhoods. This is what the Democrats have been doing for years.

    Mitt Romney made a speech to the NAACP, but neither he nor his representatives ever went into the local neighborhoods where blacks live. He never talked directly to blacks.

    Mitt Romney’s Spanish-speaking son made a few speeches to Hispanic organizations in Florida, but no one went into the neighborhoods there—or in Texas (which as a state went for Romney, but not the Hispanic population), or in Illinois, or in New York, or in California, or in…—to talk directly to Hispanics where they live.

    Mitt Romney didn’t even pay lip service to the Asian demographic.

    Eric Hines

    Comment by E Hines — November 8, 2012 @ 12:34 pm - November 8, 2012

  22. I’d like to see GOP distance themselves from religious conservatives whose narrow views on human sexuality turn off a lot of single women, minorities and LGBT members who have the potential to join the GOP bandwagon.

    Comment by Rafa Delfin — November 8, 2012 @ 6:09 pm - November 8, 2012

  23. 22.I’d like to see GOP distance themselves from religious conservatives whose narrow views on human sexuality turn off a lot of single women, minorities and LGBT members who have the potential to join the GOP bandwagon.

    Comment by Rafa Delfin — November 8, 2012 @ 6:09 pm – November 8, 2012

    Because, of course, all of these incumbents vote based on their vagina, skin color, or with whom they want to have sex, rather than concerning themselves with topics that affect EVERY American.

    No thank you. The GOP needs to stay the party of adults, not of childish panderers who try to get the attention of people who are stupid enough to believe that Republicans want to ban tampons, deport all immigrants, and put gays in death camps. These people are irrational and bigoted halfwits who won’t deal with facts and logic, and there’s no need to waste time on them.

    Comment by North Dallas Thirty — November 8, 2012 @ 7:51 pm - November 8, 2012

  24. The only kind of single woman who would be turned off by (alleged) conservatives’ narrow views of sexuality, is a woman who is liberal (as in, statist) to begin with.

    Do a thought experiment. Suppose you could relive the 2012 with one small change: knowing with absolute certainty that Romney would do nothing whatever against single women exercising their sexuality.

    Would your vote have changed? I’m saying up front that I would tend to doubt it.

    Comment by ILoveCapitalism — November 8, 2012 @ 8:07 pm - November 8, 2012

  25. Nicely done, ILC.

    The vast majority of these concern trolls are looking, not for facts, but for rationalization.

    Call them what they are, which are bigots.

    Comment by North Dallas Thirty — November 9, 2012 @ 3:13 am - November 9, 2012

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