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  1. Gee, that would be great if we still had limited, Constitutional Government. But since the states are now just vassals of the Federal Government, what does it matter?

    Comment by V the K — November 11, 2012 @ 4:02 pm - November 11, 2012

  2. But since the states are now just vassals of the Federal Government

    It matters because the 10th Amendment still exists, and the states are where the national elections are won, over the long run.

    The people also validated the behavior of the Federal House of Representatives. That they also validated the behavior of the Federal Senate (the net loss was because the Republicans ran a couple of idiots; it had nothing to do with principle) and the President just shows confusion–which means they still can be persuaded. The exit polls also validated conservatism’s tenets. Conservatism is alive and well.

    It’s way too soon for defeatist claptrap.

    Eric Hines

    Comment by E Hines — November 11, 2012 @ 4:21 pm - November 11, 2012

  3. The exit polls also validated conservatism’s tenets.

    How many times have you heard a liberal say, “I support capitalism?” or “I don’t support all those crazy environmental laws.” Or, “I think we need to cut some spending.”

    Fine. Great. They say they agree with us.

    Then, they go and vote for socialist, environmentally extreme, fiscally irresponsible Democrats because, “Republicans want to outlaw abortion.”

    Sorry, I just don’t by the crap that people support conservative ideas than vote for radical liberals. It makes no sense.

    If you say “I support free markets and fiscal responsbility” and then vote for Democrats, you’re simply a liar.

    Comment by V the K — November 11, 2012 @ 4:37 pm - November 11, 2012

  4. For the last six months, I’ve been called an Eeyore, a cynic, and a pessimist because I’ve been saying, “Obama will run a vicious, scorched Earth campaign like Harry Reid’s 2010 campaign to vilify Mitt Romney. It will work, and he will win.”

    I was right about that, and I’m right about this, too.

    Comment by V the K — November 11, 2012 @ 4:39 pm - November 11, 2012

  5. Our party should not freak out. We lost in many cases because of bad candidates, esp. with the U.S. senate. We lost the presidential race by a smaller margin than Kerry lost to Bush, and I don’t remember Democrats in 2004 thinking they needed to totally revamp their party. Obama won largely by discouraging people from voting for Romney and by mining residual Bush fatigue rather than encouraging people to vote for him. He has his work cut out for himself in impressing the huge portion of America that voted for Romney, sat out he election, or voted for him with serious reservations. This doesn’t mean the GOP shouldn’t rethink how it approaches issues or recruits candidates, but the GOP should reject the push to fundamentally change itself.

    Comment by chad — November 11, 2012 @ 5:05 pm - November 11, 2012

  6. When the Democrats got shellacked in 2010, I remember exactly 0 calls for the Democrats to moderate or transform themselves.

    Comment by V the K — November 11, 2012 @ 5:08 pm - November 11, 2012

  7. I find the above stat to be fairly meaningless. You could have seven small states that have a Republican lock on the statehouse, but it may take only one large populous state with an overwhelming Dem demographic to make those Repub victories mute. If the ratio of Dems to Repubs are consistently much more favorable to the Dems in most of the larger populous states, then there isn’t much to cheer about. Keep in mind that it’s quite possible that Conservative Californians who fled this state have moved to states that are more favorable to them as far as political POV is concerned, and that migration probably helped the Repubs increases in statehouse victories. The most important stat is national registration numbers for the party. What are the registration numbers for the last few election cycles?

    Comment by Sonicfrog — November 11, 2012 @ 5:48 pm - November 11, 2012

  8. On my last comment…. We live through this every election cycle here in the San Joaquin Valley. This is a large, very conservative area. We elect conservatives to most every position we can, and vote conservative on most issues. But it doesn’t matter, because the vote in just the LA area pretty much cancels out most any progress conservatives ever make in the voting booth.

    Comment by Sonicfrog — November 11, 2012 @ 6:04 pm - November 11, 2012

  9. When the Democrats got shellacked in 2010, I remember exactly 0 calls for the Democrats to moderate or transform themselves.

    That’s because democrats viewed it as a fluke.

    But you have a good point-why is it the GOP must dump its base when they lose, but the democrats aren’t asked to do so?

    I do think there are some people that suffer from a disconnect between what voters say they believe and what they do. I also think some voters are simply ignorant-many of them get caught up in the trivial things but don’t pay attention to what their candidate does.

    A good example was a video I watched before the election where a fake reporter lied and said that Romney supported certain things that Obama has advocated and done during his presidency. It was funny to see all the Obama voters rant about drones and other stuff, then when the reporter revealed that he had lied and Obama had done it, every single liberal said they didn’t care because Obama was still better except one who said he was going to have to do some research and do some thinking.

    Comment by Just Me — November 11, 2012 @ 6:30 pm - November 11, 2012

  10. Sonicfrog, it’s not just the small states, FL, NC, PA, OH, IN, MI, WI, TX, GA, TN and AZ, all having 10 or more electoral votes have GOP governors and have control of both houses of the legislature.

    Comment by B. Daniel Blatt — November 11, 2012 @ 6:48 pm - November 11, 2012

  11. One other observation—Democratic GOTV just seems to work much better in presidential election years than midterm elections. A lot of their voters sit out midterm elections, it seems. I think that largely explains why the GOP dominates in governorships; it’s a lot easier imagining someone like Scott Walker winning in 2010 or 2014 than in 2008 or 2012. 2006 midterms were different, but Republicans sat that one out too given frustration with the war, Katrina, “Culture of Corruption,” and overall fatigue with the GOP. I don’t think Republicans will be dispirited in 2014, and I think Republican turnout in 2014 will be like 2010. The big question though will be what Democratic turnout will be in 2014. Will they manage to get their voters out, or will their enthusiasm fade from 2012 levels? Of course, events will have a huge say in which party will come out ahead in 2014.

    Comment by chad — November 11, 2012 @ 6:59 pm - November 11, 2012

  12. Look, Republicans have unseated exactly ONE sitting Democratic incumbent in over 100 years (Carter). There was no reason to expect we would do it this time. The problem I have is with my perception, and this may not be reality but it is my perception, that the RNC put almost no resources in the down-ticket races. It seems like all resources were put in the Presidential campaign. So we had no emphasis on the Congressional and state races and no national GOTV effort on election day.

    Comment by crosspatch — November 11, 2012 @ 8:24 pm - November 11, 2012

  13. Disagree, crosspatch. The reason Republicans can’t win is because the American Dream is no longer working hard and building wealth. For a majority of the population, the American Dream is free sh-t from the Government for life. The Democrats have tapped into that.

    Free stuff from Santa Claus will always beat a paycheck from the boss.

    Comment by V the K — November 11, 2012 @ 8:51 pm - November 11, 2012

  14. Right, V. The perception is out there that the game is rigged and “working” gets you nowhere, might as well take the “free stuff”.

    Comment by Richard Bell — November 11, 2012 @ 9:02 pm - November 11, 2012

  15. Republicans CAN win. Bush won in 2004 by a larger margin than Obama won in 2012. It hasn’t been THAT long. We are only talking about ONE Presidential administration. Defeating an incumbent is HARD. As I said, Republicans have done it only once in over a century. Remember 2010? We are in better shape after the elections of 2012 than we were after 2008 elections. We have a mid term coming up in two years.

    I’m willing to bet you that if this election were two white guys running against each other, Romney would have won big.

    Comment by crosspatch — November 11, 2012 @ 9:20 pm - November 11, 2012

  16. One democratic shift that favours the Republicans is that red states tend to be growing in population at faster rates than blue states (the results of the 2010 census and the resultant changes in electoral college votes gave the GOP twelve more electoral votes). Hopefully this doesn’t result in making these states less Republican (which is probably the case in some states, such as Arizona), although some of these states are so reliably Republican (such as Utah) that it would take a huge influx of Democratic voters to make them competetive.

    Comment by Rattlesnake — November 11, 2012 @ 9:32 pm - November 11, 2012

  17. Question: Of the 14 states that now have one-party rule; do any of them have any chance of ever becoming two-party… let alone Republican… states again?

    Comment by V the K — November 11, 2012 @ 11:27 pm - November 11, 2012

  18. We often have the tendency to look at current trends and assume they will continue unabated. In reality, there always tend to be events that can’t always be foreseen that shift the way society goes. History tends to be much more self-correcting than we are normally willing to acknowledge. This doesn’t mean I’m not worried about trends I see, but I don’t see any point in being hopelessly pessimistic.

    Comment by chad — November 11, 2012 @ 11:32 pm - November 11, 2012

  19. True, chad… but sometimes history works through these things on a very long timescale. A Dark Age lasting centuries is not an impossible, nor even an unlikely, consequence of our decadence.
    created in

    Comment by V the K — November 12, 2012 @ 12:03 am - November 12, 2012

  20. History tends to be much more self-correcting than we are normally willing to acknowledge.

    Yes, and these corrections often involve the collapse of a once powerful civilization. Some people seem to believe that, unlike the Roman Empire and Ottoman Empire (et cetera) before it, that American-dominated Western Civilization can simply perpetuate itself. It can’t, and lessons from history must be learned for it to survive.

    Comment by Rattlesnake — November 12, 2012 @ 1:26 am - November 12, 2012

  21. True, Rattlesnake.

    But one must remember that liberals never remember history, because they believe that everyone who came before them was an idiot.

    Comment by North Dallas Thirty — November 12, 2012 @ 10:18 am - November 12, 2012

  22. do any of them have any chance of ever becoming two-party… let alone Republican… states again?

    Mass is pretty much a goner. They occasionally elect the odd republican here or there, but they voted in a lying idiot to replace a fairly left leaning republican senator. They voted party over character and that tells me there will never be a viable GOP in Mass.

    I also think California is pretty much gone. From what I understand they are bleeding middle income people like mad, and that the state is becomming mostly a state of very wealthy and very poor. Not sure they can sustain any kind of government especially when their pension bubble bursts.

    Comment by Just Me — November 12, 2012 @ 11:39 am - November 12, 2012

  23. Sonicfrog, it’s not just the small states, FL, NC, PA, OH, IN, MI, WI, TX, GA, TN and AZ, all having 10 or more electoral votes have GOP governors and have control of both houses of the legislature.

    Thanks Dan for the info. Do you know what the national numbers of Republican registration vs Democrat are? And what has the trend been in the last 8 years or so? To me that is the more relevant info.

    Comment by Sonicfrog — November 12, 2012 @ 2:50 pm - November 12, 2012

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