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Biden, Please

Posted by V the K at 3:12 pm - March 26, 2014.
Filed under: Divas

When pandering to a group of people so pathetically insecure and high-strung they consider their lives and loves meaningless without a stamp of approval from the Government, it never hurts to go full Drama Queen.

Two years after getting ahead of President Barack Obama in saying he supported gay marriage, Biden on Saturday called LGBT workplace discrimination “close to barbaric” and “bizarre” in a speech to the Human Rights Campaign.

Bonnie Tyler’s “Total Eclipse of the Heart” video from 1984 was less over the top.  Has anyone in the Obama regime ever described the actions of the Taliban or Palestinian Terrorists as “barbaric?”

2008 Obama supporter calls President “divisive and polarizing”

Posted by B. Daniel Blatt at 8:12 pm - October 26, 2012.
Filed under: Divas,Divider-in-Chief,Strong Women

Blogress Ann Althouse who, in 2008, thought Obama “was the better bet, compared to the GOP alternative” recently transcribed this video she watched on Instapundit featuring the sage diva, Camille Paglia, a woman who not just backed, but also contributed to, Barack Obama four years ago:

Not least: I consider him, now, one of the most racially divisive and polarizing figures ever. I think it’s going to take years to undo the damage to relationships between the races.

Read the whole thing. Now, I’m going to watch the video.

UPDATE:  Just watched the video and it’s well worth your time.  Love what she says early on about art.  She’s spot on.  Spot on.  Segment quoted above is just before 12 minute mark.

NB:  In the original version of this post, I neglected to include the name of the person whose remarks Althouse had transcribed.

Who is the cattiest Catwoman?

Posted by B. Daniel Blatt at 5:22 pm - July 17, 2012.
Filed under: Divas,Movies/Film & TV,Strong Women

Who is the cattiest Catwoman?
Halle Berry
Eartha Kitt
Lee Meriwether
Julie Newmar
Michelle Pfeiffer
  
Free polls from Pollhost.com

Will Anne Hathaway be as catty as Eartha Kitt?

Posted by B. Daniel Blatt at 5:12 pm - July 17, 2012.
Filed under: Divas,Movies/Film & TV,Strong Women

With just three days until the Dark Knight Rises, we at GayPatriot have been wondering whether Anne Hathaway can hold a candle to the cattiest of Catwomen, Eartha Kitt:

Perhaps we should poll our readers to see who was the cattiest. . . . Was it Miss Kitt, or perhaps Halle Berry or maybe Lee Meriwether, not to mention Julie Newmar or who could forget Michelle Pfeiffer?

Seems my gay friends are torn between Eartha and Julie while my straight male friends gravitate toward Michelle.

Obama won’t show us any legislation on gay marriage:
(still gay Democrats are giddy about his words on gay marriage)

At 0:49 below, Audrey Hepburn demonstrates how gay Americans should have responded to President Obama’s statement on gay marriage yesterday:


Like everything with Obama, all we get is “words, words, words.”

This is not just a gay conservative talking.  Several voices on the left have found that there’s not much there there in the president’s sudden shift on same-sex marriage.  At the Gawker, John Cook calls the statement a “cowardly cop-out”:  ”it seems fairly clear from the network’s coverage that his announcement amounts to much less than meets the eye. He now believes that gay couples should be able to marry.

At the far left magazine Mother Jones, Adam Serwer reports that his colleague . . .

. . . David Corn spoke with an administration source and asked whether the president recognized gay marriage as a right. The official replied, “He has always said that it is a state issue, and he’s not suggesting changing that. He did not support the North Carolina amendment, but he’s not saying he will bring up a piece of federal legislation on gay marriage. This is how he feels himself about the issue, and he leaves it to the states.”

Emphasis added.  He’s not bringing up legislation?!?  And all my left-leaning gay friends on Facebook are so giddy about the statement; Obama’s just leaving it to the states.

Shouldn’t they be insisting that he show us he loves us by putting some political capital on the line and backing legislation to make federal recognition of gay relationships a reality?

He’s like the guy who tells his beloved how much he loves her, tells her wants to get married, but refuses to buy a ring or set a date.

The greatest confrontation between women ever caught on film?

I am not entirely comfortable with the term, “catfight” in describing the confrontation between these two Titanesses of the silver screen–but best screen confrontation between women on screen was not as catchy — and quite clunky a title. Well, I found a better; it may lack the punch of the original, but at least I’m comfortable with it.

Here, we see Irene Papas, one of few actresses to actually get the woman whose face launched a thousand ships.  Helen of Argos, later of Troy, finally of Argos is a far more complex woman than the screen beauty portrayed in most screen versions of the Trojan War.  In a man’s world, she knows how to use her feminine charms to win her way, even if it means defying her patron deity, Aphrodite.  I do not say this lightly:  Papas is the greatest living actress.

And when the divine Miss Kate plays Helen’s erstwhile mother-in-law, Hecuba, in The Trojan Women their confrontation just sizzles.

In a war fought over Helen, Hecuba lost her husband and her sons, all that was dear to her. And in the clip above, we believe that when Hepburn, er, Hecuba, asks Menelaus to kill Helen, she really wants to see Papas dead.

The face launched a thousand ships, carrying warriors which would kill thousands of Trojan men.

Paula Deen: Bringing GayPatriot Readers Together

Before I drove cross country in 2010, I had never heard of Southern cooking diva Paula Deen, but I credit her for the harmony of our readers’ dinner in Atlanta that spring.  You see, when we gathered in that august town, I was concerned; one of our critics (with whom I have corresponded at least since 2006) would be joining us — along with two of our most outspoken conservative readers, one who, two years after the 2008 election, still sported a McCain-Palin sticker (with the Arizona Senator’s name removed) on his truck.

I had feared I might have to play peacemaker.  Well, I didn’t have to.  I don’t know how Paula Deen came up, but as soon as she did, all my Atlanta readers found something to talk about — how they delighted in this diva, enjoying her books, TV show and recipes.  They discussed which ones they had tried and home and celebrated her appreciation for butter.  Paula Deen, in short, bridged the political divide.

Aware of this woman’s capacity to foster harmony, my ears naturally perked up when my correspondent James Richardson alerted me this weekend to an article he wrote, taking to task “Northern” food critics who would bring this Southern diva down:

“Thinking of getting into the leg-breaking business, so I can profitably sell crutches later,” [New York-based foodie Anthony] Bourdain said Tuesday. He has also previously called Deen the “worst, most dangerous person to America” for her country cooking indulgence. Even 2011 James Beard winner Jose Andres said that Dean should “endorse a vegetable or fruit” instead of a diabetes drug.

But the Bronx cheer for apparent chef-turned-rebel terrorist Deen, a prototypical Southern mother with a lifetime’s recipes of irredeemably deep-fried dishes, is less a reflection of the culinary elitism that runs through Bourdain’s vice-ridden travelogues than the regionalist snobbery that fuels its appeal.

. . . .

From food to faith, the mythic Dixie–soulful and abundant, passionate and insubmissive–has always clashed with the rigidly cosmopolitan north, which keeps an ever watchful eye on we, her unlearned, drawling wards. (more…)

Grande Conservative Blogress Diva 2012–Nominations Take Two

Posted by B. Daniel Blatt at 3:19 am - December 21, 2011.
Filed under: Blogging,Blogress Divas,Divas

Due to an unusually busy December, I have not yet had the chance to finalize the ballot for the most coveted crown in the blogosphere, the diamond tiara bestowed upon that distinguished blogress who commands the respect of gay conservatives, the Grande Conservative Blogress Diva.

Last year, Robin of Berkeley won the coveted tiara with her American Thinker colleague Clarice Feldman joining Neo-neocon in the high-heeled slippers that mark the Regent.

Nominees in that contest included:

MeredithAncret nominated http://www.dirtysexandpolitics.com/ but methink she might qualify as a diva herself.  Please feel free to second the above nominees or submit your own either in the comments or in an e-mail.

Nominations Open for Grande Conservative Blogress Diva 2011

Posted by B. Daniel Blatt at 2:01 pm - December 8, 2011.
Filed under: Blogging,Blogress Divas,Divas,Strong Women

As you know, we here at GayPatriot define a diva as a strong woman who commands the respect of men.  And once again, it’s time to pick that blogress who best defines that quality.  In past years, I’ve linked previous nominees and diva-esque blogresses.  This year, I’ll link those past posts when I get a moment, but for now will leave it up to you to nominate those most deserving of this coveted honor.

We’ll keep nominations open for one week, through December 15 at which point Bruce and I will pick those lucky ladies to appear on the ballot.

Oh, happy day! Oh, Happy, Happy!

Athena likes me:

Coulter, Dubbed “Gay Icon,” Named to GOProud Board

Posted by B. Daniel Blatt at 7:50 pm - August 9, 2011.
Filed under: Divas,GOProud,Strong Women

Announcing Ann Coulter was joining the organization’s Advisory Council as Honorary Chair with the official title of “Gay Icon”, Christopher Barron, Chairman of GOProud’s Board, called the diva best-selling author “a brilliant and fearless leader of the conservative movement”:

. . . we are honored to have her as part of GOProud’s leadership. . . . Ann helped put our organization on the map. Politics is full of the meek, the compromising and the apologists – Ann, like GOProud, is the exact opposite of all of those things.

Indeed she is.  Quite the opposite.  Here’s Ann on C-SPAN.

The lady doesn’t mince words.

RELATED: Reconsidering Ann Coulter

Palin criticism for grownups

Posted by B. Daniel Blatt at 12:36 am - August 8, 2011.
Filed under: Blogging,Divas,Sarah Palin,Strong Women

It seems that whenever I fault the news media for going overboard about Sarah Palin, any Palin-hater within earshot will rebuke me for demanding that people refrain from criticizing the accomplished Alaska reformer.  They contend I wish to silence Palin critics. Heck, I don’t even seek to silence the rabid Palin-obsessives, just lament that those who criticize the charismatic conservative celebrity (more often than not) exaggerate her flaws, if not make up (or truncate) comments she has made or views she holds, all while refusing to acknowledge Sarah Palin’s strengths as an individual and her record as an office-holder.

Why can’t some people just express their disagreement with Mrs. Palin in a civil tone — and take the time to familiarize himself with her actual arguments?  Those who question her competence to hold office should at least consider her actual record in office.  But, some in the news media would rather ask gotcha questions than inquire into that record.

Despite the ignorance of many Palin critics of what that Republican woman actually did in Alaska, she was an accomplished reformer who had worked with Republicans and Democrats alike while governor of the Last Frontier.  Before questioning Palin’s qualifications to lead, Ann Althouse did just that when commenting on a movie based on the Alaskan’s accomplishments:

The material — which impresses some people, even to the point of getting confused into thinking that the movie is good — shows Sarah Palin’s rise to power in Alaska and her excellent achievements and immense popularity as governor. The problem is that all of this happened in the context of boldly and bravely challenging the corrupt Republican establishment. This made her very popular with Democrats in Alaska. (more…)

Lucy in 1980: Some of the most gifted people I know are gay

It seems that whenever I hear a TV show is well-written, I learn that a number of its writers are gay.  I would dare say that a number of those who helped provide the set-ups and dialogue for Lucille Ball’s pioneering physical comedy were guys like us.

The funny lady all but confirmed this in a 1980 interview from People magazine quoted in an Advocate article paying tribute yesterday to a woman one man called “the true gay icon”:

Ball was asked her thoughts on a number of subjects, including gay rights. “It’s perfectly all right with me,” she replied. “Some of the most gifted people I’ve ever met or read about are homosexual. How can you knock it?”

Ronald Reagan Remembers Lucille Ball For Doing it Her Way

Posted by B. Daniel Blatt at 3:39 am - August 7, 2011.
Filed under: Divas,Humor,Movies/Film & TV,Ronald Reagan,Strong Women

Because of the craziness of this past week, a visiting nephew and a visiting father, I somehow got my dates messed up.  I had planned on celebrating this centennial of Lucille Ball’s birthday today, Sunday, August 6, only looking up at my calendar yesterday afternoon to realize that it was indeed, Saturday, August 6 so Sunday would be the 100th anniversary of Lucy’s birth plus one day.

In honor of that great lady, I tracked down a few videos honoring her.  Here, the Gipper offers a tribute to the woman who made millions laugh.

Note how at about 0:46 into the video when Mike Wallace asks Ronald Reagan what made Lucy so special, the great man replied, “I don’t know that I can answer that.  You just accepted it and reveled in it, but you didn’t try to get down and analyze what she could do.  But, it just was peculiarly hers and her way.  I don’t know of anyone you could compare her to.”

What a great way to appreciate a great artist.  You don’t analyze how they do it; you just delight in how well they do it, that they make us laugh or cry — or just plain feel more alive and better connected to the universe and those around us.

Is Dolly Parton the True Gay Republican Diva?
(& you have three chances to see her in LA in the next 16 days)

Perhaps, the Southern background (or, in Bruce’s case, residence) of many of my gay friends makes Dolly Parton appear to rank with Judy, Barbra and Ethel in our diva pantheon. And it seems nearly all (yes, I said that right, nearly all) of my gay conservative friends love Dolly.

In sixteen days, she’s appearing for the first time ever at the Hollywood Bowl. And two films at Outfest (opening tonight) feature this country diva. On Saturday, July 16, you can catch Hollywood to Dollywood, a documentary about gay twins who, in an RV named Jolene, set out on a cross country trek to get their script to the buxom blond.

And on Wednesday, July 13, you can singalong with Dolly (et al.) in the Best Little Whorehouse in Texas on a very big screen at the John Anson Ford Amphitheater.

Click on the movie titles for ticket information; (more…)

On naming a West Hollywood Street for Elizabeth Taylor

Posted by B. Daniel Blatt at 1:27 pm - April 1, 2011.
Filed under: Divas,HIV/AIDS,LA Stories,Movies/Film & TV,Strong Women

Since Dame Elizabeth Taylor passed last week, many people have blogged on that lady’s class, compassion and stardom.  Roger Simon explored what how a young (heterosexual) male moviegoer experienced this beauty in his blog at Pajamas while Camille Paglia examined her sex appeal and screen presence over at Salon.

This past weekend, I watched Cat on a Hot Tin Roof again, apprecaiting it more the second time, better able to see the movie as a different story from the play on which it is based.  In the film, screenwriters transformed the gay subtext to make it more palatable to a general audience.  This allowed them to bring out her sex appeal.  And did she sizzle, especially set against the bitterness of Paul Newman‘s Brick.  We really believe that Maggie the Cat is alive.  And we root for her to win back her husband.

Had the screen Brick been a closet homosexual, her sex appeal would have been wasted.  When he first saw it, his teenage heterosexual hormones raging, Simon “suffered shortness of breath.”  And, watching it this weekend, this gay guy can get what that straight man — or any other — would want to have some, well, private time with Taylor’s Maggie.

She just looked so good in Metrocolor.  Kudos to the set design team of Henry Grace and Robert Priestley and art directors William A. Horning and Urie McCleary for creating backgrounds which allowed her to stand out in every scene.

In the LA Weekly, Patrick Range McDonald reports,  ”West Hollywood residents have been calling and writing City Hall” asking the city to name a street after this classy lady.  (more…)

Elizabeth Taylor’s Life in the Limelight

Posted by B. Daniel Blatt at 2:52 am - March 24, 2011.
Filed under: Divas,HIV/AIDS,Movies/Film & TV,Strong Women

As fate would have it, one of the movies I received from Netflix on the day of Elizabeth Taylor‘s passing was the original Father of the Bride with her in one of the title roles.  And in honor of her passing, I watched it.

And this movie really does hold up. Not just because of the solid direction and smart script, portraying a situation which helps define a man’s relationship to his daughter (and hers to him), but also because of the players. Joan Bennett as the mother is one of those underappreciated character actors who more than pulls her weight. But, it’s Spencer Tracy and Dame Elizabeth who really steal the show, he as the archetypal father and she as the archetypal daughter who has Daddy wrapped around each of her little fingers.

When she calls at the end to tell him she loves him, she knows that expression will make him melt. And just watching her we know it too.

It’s odd to see a film, particularly today where she has third billing. Given the way she looked in this film and the way she played an all-American girl getting married, it’s no wonder this role will help catapult her to superstardom. She looked as Tracy’s Stanley Banks says upon seeing her in her wedding dress, “like a princess in a fairy tale.” Indeed.

There is, to be sure, a bit of irony in the seminal nature of this particular role to her career. She would have many weddings in her life.

In watching the extras, I realized yet again how closely her personal life was tied to her public image — and wondered if that could explain the brevity of her marriages; no man could live up to her fairy tale expectations.  She married Conrad Hilton Jr when she was just 18, the ceremony taking place one month before the release of the film featuring her as a bride.

The extras after the film include newsreel footage of that first wedding, with a passel of paparazzi and ropes holding back the crowds.  From her adolescence and her earliest adulthood, Elizabeth Taylor was always in the limelight.

In the twilight of her life, she used that limelight to good end, as our reader Jim Michaud noted: “Her work on behalf of AIDS was incredible as well as valued at the time (ignorance and discrimination of victims was still rampant during the mid-80s).”  You could honor this great lady by sponsoring one of our readers who’ll be riding in the AIDS ride this June. (more…)

In Memoriam Elizabeth Taylor

Posted by B. Daniel Blatt at 1:18 pm - March 23, 2011.
Filed under: Divas,Movies/Film & TV,Strong Women

This past weekend, I watched Father’s Little Dividend, the sequel to the original Father of the Bride.  While the story was weak, the cast was strong, particularly Spencer Tracy as the father the expectant Elizabeth Taylor.  And she was always exquisite.  Even when she seemed to phone in her roles, as it the celebrated shipwreck, Cleopatra, she looked exquisite on screen.

She was truly a movie star.  And she leaves with us a number of brilliant performances as well, particularly in films from the 1950s, including Suddenly, Last Summer and A Place in the Sun.  That great lady died earlier “today at Los Angeles’ Cedars-Sinai Hospital. She was 79“:

“She was surrounded by her children: Michael Wilding, Christopher Wilding, Liza Todd, and Maria Burton,” Taylor’s publicist, Sally Morrison, said in a statement.

In the same statement, Michael Howard Wilding, 58, memorialized his mother:

“My Mother was an extraordinary woman who lived life to the fullest, with great passion, humor, and love,” he said. “Though her loss is devastating to those of us who held her so close and so dear, we will always be inspired by her enduring contribution to our world. Her remarkable body of work in film, her ongoing success as a businesswoman, and her brave and relentless advocacy in the fight against HIV/AIDS, all make us all incredibly proud of what she accomplished. We know, quite simply, that the world is a better place for Mom having lived in it. Her legacy will never fade, her spirit will always be with us, and her love will live forever in our hearts.

The New York Times reports:

In a world of flickering images, Elizabeth Taylor was a constant star. First appearing onscreen at age 9, she grew up there, never passing through an awkward age. It was one quick leap from “National Velvet” to “A Place in the Sun” and from there to “Cleopatra” as she was indelibly transformed from a vulnerable child actress into a voluptuous film queen.

In a career of more than 70 years and more than 50 films, she won two Academy Awards as best actress, for her performances as a call girl in “Butterfield 8” (in 1960) and as the acid-tongued Martha in “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” (in 1966). Mike Nichols, who directed her in “Virginia Woolf,” said he considered her “one of the greatest cinema actresses.”

She will be missed, but she leaves behind an incredible, incredible body of work.

The Two and Only Have Fallen

Posted by B. Daniel Blatt at 8:36 pm - February 28, 2011.
Filed under: Divas,Movies/Film & TV,Strong Women

Jane Russell has died.

*Click here to understand the title (if you don’t already).

Confronting the Prejudices Against Gay Conservatives

It seems that some liberals in the media have a remarkable unity of thought when it comes to gay conservatives.  Since our pal Tammy Bruce started writing for Britain’s left-of-center publication, The Guardian, she’s asked the same question we at GayPatriot get on almost a daily basis:

. . . what is it like to be gay and conservative?

After all, those conservatives hate the homos, don’t they? It must be very, very difficult for me, one concerned reader noted, to be among the intolerant and hateful.

And no matter how many times we relate our experiences, we almost always get the same incredulous look, as if they know better what it’s like to be gay and conservative (from reading the New York Times) than we know what it’s like being gay and conservative (by being openly gay in conservative circles).  In their reaction to us, they display a certain prejudice, a prejudice being:

1. an unfavorable opinion or feeling formed beforehand or without knowledge, thought, or reason[,] 2. any preconceived opinion or feeling, either favorable or unfavorable.

They have come to their opinion without knowledge of the real experiences of gay conservatives.  Not wonder Tammy finds that

The real story of bigotry and intolerance is the fact that it lives and thrives on the left. As a gay woman who spent most of her adult life pushing the cart for liberal causes with liberal friends in a liberal city, I found that sexism, racism and homophobia are staples in the liberal world. The huge irony is liberals spend every ounce of energy promoting the notion that they are the banner carriers of individualism and personal freedom, yet the hammer comes down on anyone who dares not to conform to, or who dissents even in part from, the liberal agenda.

Read the whole thing.

We have, by and large, found welcome on the right.  And over time, the intolerance on the left makes us stronger.  And helps us judge the character of our interlocutors.  For while we often deal with liberal bigotry, we also frequently find open-minded “progressives” who in their interactions with us demonstrate an ability to rise above the prejudices of their peers.