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Like I Said, Be Careful

Posted by V the K at 3:17 pm - May 11, 2014.
Filed under: Good Advice

You really have to be careful with who you meet and how.

A Bosnian refugee who made Kentucky his home was found beaten to death in Pennsylvania.

The Dizdarevic family fled Bosnia in 1993 and settled in Kentucky. After graduating from Madison Southern, Dino Dizdarevic went on to get a chemical engineering degree from the University of Louisville and moved to Pennsylvania just a few months ago.

Dizdarevic was supposed to fly home Thursday for the Kentucky Derby, but when his sister went to Cincinnati to pick him up from the airport he never showed.

His family reported him missing and not long after, he was found beaten and strangled at the bottom of a fire escape in Philadelphia. Police sources say it appears he met up with someone on the social app, Grindr.

The Tea Party View of Government, Succinctly Expressed

Posted by V the K at 7:42 pm - April 25, 2014.
Filed under: Good Advice,Ideas & Trends

Matt Kibbe, president of FreedomWorks, has a new book coming out, titled, ”Don’t Hurt People and Don’t Take Their Stuff: A Libertarian Manifesto.”

“Don’t Hurt People, and Don’t Take Their Stuff,” is a pretty neat formulation of the proper role of Government; and is precisely the opposite of the Progressive Socialist philosophy that rules now. It harkens back to P.J. O’Rourke’s quote about the role of Government, “Keep your hands to yourself and mind your own business.”

Bill, keep your hands to yourself. Hillary, mind your own business.
Hat Tip: Daily Caller

Living in the present in challenging times

Several of my Facebook friends like to post inspirational and thought-provoking quotes on a regular basis.  Two or three of them have recently posted a quote which has been attributed to Lao Tzu which reads:

If you are depressed you are living in the past.
If you are anxious you are living in the future.
If you are at peace you are living in the present.

As someone who has lately been bouncing back and forth between these states of mind, I can appreciate the essential wisdom of the quote.  Most of my feelings of depression lately have been spurred on by my regrets about things I wish I had done differently in my life, and so in that regard, they are an instance of dwelling in the past.  Most of my anxiety stems from my concerns about where our country is headed under its current leadership (or lack thereof), and my feelings of uncertainty or even paralysis as to what is or should be the best path for me to take from this point forward.  The more I think about it, the more overwhelming the many different options start to become.

Partly because of the circumstances which have fueled both my recent feelings of depression and of anxiety, I also have to wonder whether or not the “living in the present” endorsed by the quote is really so desirable after all.  When things are going well, yes, that sounds ideal, but isn’t there the risk of a sort of complacency which can result in self-indulgence, lack of ambition and disengagement?
I thought of these points and more yesterday when Glenn Reynolds linked to a post by Sarah Hoyt entitled “If You Don’t Work, You Die.”  In the post, Hoyt reflects on the importance of what she refers to as envy and striving for growth and life, which, to my mind suggests a certain resistance to complacency.  She reflects on an experiment in Denver in the 1970s with a guaranteed minimum income and the finding that a certain segment of the population was content to live on it and to stop striving to better their lives, and she speculates that it is partly an inherited trait which had value in the conservation of social energy.  The part of the post that fascinated me the most was when she described herself in the following terms:
Some of us are broken.  We were given both envy and high principles.  We can’t even contemplate bringing others down to level things, but instead we work madly to increase our status.  (No, it’s not how I think about it, but it’s probably what’s going on in the back of the monkey brain.)  Most of humanity however is functional.  Give them enough to eat, and a place to live, and no matter how unvaried the diet and how small/terrible the place, most people will stay put.
It seems to me that she has hit on something crucial there because although I’m often tempted to focus on being content with things the way are, every so often something happens to jar me from that state of mind, either by making me feel depressed or anxious or by throwing me off balance completely with some new dream or hope.
I’d like to write more about the disruptive power and potential value of such dreams, but for the time being, I’d like to pose a question for our readers.   When we live in difficult and challenging times, how can one try to remain “in the present” without falling into complacency or without becoming disengaged from the sorts of issues and problems that threaten to make existence even more trying and difficult?

The Day After Independence Day

Sounds like the title of a great movie!  Heh, heh.  Well, I’m still in a nostalgic mood for what our Founding Fathers did on July 4, 1776.  And I caught this item on today’s Heritage Foundation blog.  I hope you find it as inspiring and motivating as I did when I read it this morning.

Happy Birthday America! America is 234 years old. She was born on July 4, 1776, with the passage of the Declaration of Independence.  Since then, America has grown from thirteen colonies on the east coast to fill a vast continent. Her economic and military power is envied around the world. And the American people are hardworking, churchgoing, affluent, and generous.

Independence Day is an opportunity each year to remember the root of our success—our founding principles as set forth in the Declaration of Independence.

The Declaration of Independence serves as a philosophical statement of America’s first principles. As Matthew Spalding describes, the Declaration affirms that all men are created equal. By nature, men have a right to liberty that is inalienable, meaning it cannot be given up or taken away. And because individuals equally possess such inalienable rights, governments derive their just powers from the consent of those governed. The purpose of government is to secure these fundamental rights, and the people retain the right to alter or abolish a government that fails to do so.

These principles have made America the great nation it is today. But, since the early 20th century, these principles have been under attack in the academy, the media, and popular culture. So-called progressives have rejected the existence of self-evident truths—in the Declaration of Independence and elsewhere. Instead, they embrace the notion of “Progress” that is constant change towards an unspecified end. From these faulty principles, it follows that, all men are not created equal; some people are further along in the historical process than others. There are not permanent rights with which man is endowed. Government creates rights, and these rights evolve according to the demands of the time. There is no need for consent of the governed, just experts who will tell us how to live and how to progress.

This is a serious attack on our principles, but not an insurmountable one.

We, The People are in charge.  Our government’s power comes from our consent.  And our rights come from our Creator. Never forget that!

-Bruce (GayPatriot)

Never Call a Goddess a Dog Flea

Posted by GayPatriotWest at 7:27 pm - July 25, 2009.
Filed under: Good Advice,Mythology and the real world

Commenting on the battle between Ares and Athena in Book 21 of the Odyssey, scholar Silvia Milanezi offers some sound advice:

. . . when Zeus gives permission for the god to choose their favourites, Ares challenges Athena to single combat provoking her by such harsh words as  . . . ‘dog fleas’ . . . . Athena quickly silences Ares’ insults:  she knocks him out, hitting him with a stone, and finishes him off with her laughter and insults (21.408).  He who dares call her a dog flea (421) is quickly reduced to dust.

Emphasis added.  Let that serve as reminder to you all.